If you are coming to visit this site or this blog, you or someone you know is likely struggling or has struggled with deep psychological pain. In a recent post Refusing to Forgive: 9 Steps to Break Free, Andrea commented saying:

I feel that while the blogs may provide some little clue to addressing all our concerns. It is in no way enough. I am not saying that it is your job to address our individual griefs but clearly this is a difficult and big topic that cannot be address in 300 words or so. There is no one size fits all. There is a lot of pain up above. And i wish i could talk to all these women. I hope they are all getting someone to talk with. Even if its to take these questions and points further.

Andrea has made a very important point that is worth a blog in itself. Reading a blog post by itself as the sole means of healing the enormous wounding many of have suffered from in our lives is not the answer. If you have are currently struggling from intense anxiety, depression, addiction, or trauma it is very important to seek support at the very least from a caring community, group therapy, or working with a skilled therapist and potentially psychiatrist.  

Blogs need to be taken with a grain of salt because they often only cover a piece of a topic. Length of the blog may not be quite as important as I have found in my own life that quotes or short poems at times have a greater impact than reading an entire book. This Viktor Fankl Quote has had an great impact on many people’s lives:

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”

This poem by Sufi Poet, Rumi speaks volumes about how our automatic drive to judge everything gets in our way of love:

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing, 
there is a field. I’ll meet you there. 
When the soul lies down in that grass, 
the world is too full to talk about. 
Ideas, language. Even the phrase each other 
doesn’t make any sense.

It’s important to note that online communities and blogs have a wonderful ability to create daily insight to integrate into daily life and cultivate a sense of connection in community. Blogs are not just about the people writing them as the source of therapy, they are about the community. As people respond to the blogs and hear other’s stories and questions, the thought of not being alone in this world can be healing. Blogs can be one source of support in a personal therapy practice toward health and well-being. The blog does not need to address an entire topic, but instead is meant to help us think or give us that little something to change the way we see things for a moment so that we can take it with us and apply at work and/or home.

In an effort to really reach out and support people in integrating mindfulness into daily life, I have started a twitter feed where people will be receiving very short instructions a few times a day to pop them into the present moment and become more mindful day to day. If you would like to get this click here: http://twitter.com/Mindful_Living .

Please share your thoughts, stories, and questions below. Your interaction here provides a living wisdom for us all to connect and grow from.

 


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    Last reviewed: 4 May 2009

APA Reference
Goldstein, E. (2009). When Blogs are Not Enough. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 22, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mindfulness/2009/05/when-blogs-are-not-enough/

 

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