In future posts, I’ll be writing more specifically about different definitions of mindful parenting, but in the meanwhile, I’d like to share a quote I came across from Pema Chodron, a American Tibetan Buddhist nun and spiritual leader. In her quote below, she writes about the challenges of meditation, and the importance of remaining steadfast with the practice nonetheless. As I read her words, I noticed many parallels with my experience as a parent. Just as we are encouraged to stay with our mindfulness practice, even when we don’t want to, we must also stay with parenting, stay present with our children, even when it is boring, painful, irritating, or just plain hard, as parenting often can be. I encourage you to read Pema’s words, and please, share your thoughts.

When we practice meditation we are strengthening our ability to be steadfast with ourselves. No matter what comes up—aching bones, boredom, falling asleep, or the wildest thoughts and emotions—we develop a loyalty to our experience. Although plenty of meditators consider it, we don’t run screaming out of the room. Instead we acknowledge that impulse as thinking, without labeling it right or wrong. This no small task. Never underestimate our inclination to bolt when we hurt.

We’re encouraged to meditate everyday, even for a short time, in order to cultivate this steadfastness with ourselves. We sit under all kinds of circumstances—whether we are feeling healthy or sick, whether we’re in a good mood or depressed, whether we feel our meditation is going well or is completely falling apart. As we continue to sit we see that meditation isn’t about getting it right or attaining some ideal state. It’s about being able to stay present with ourselves. It becomes increasingly clear that we won’t be free of self-destructive patterns unless we develop a compassionate understanding of what they are.

In meditation we discover our inherent restlessness. Sometimes we get up and leave. Sometimes we sit there but our bodies wiggle and squirm and our minds go far away. This can be so uncomfortable that we feel it’s impossible to stay. Yet this feeling can teach us not just about ourselves but also about what it is to be human. All of us derive security and comfort from the imaginary world of memories and fantasies and plans. We really don’t want to stay with the nakedness of our present experience. It goes against the grain to stay present. There are the times when only gentleness and a sense of humor can give us the strength to settle down.

The pith instruction is, Stay. . . stay. . . just stay. Learning to stay with ourselves in meditation is like training a dog. If we train a dog by beating it, we’ll end up with an obedient but very inflexible and rather terrified dog. The dog may obey when we say “Stay!” “Come!” “Roll over!” and “Sit up!” but he will also be neurotic and confused. By contrast, training with kindness results in someone who is flexible and confident, who doesn’t become upset when situations are unpredictable and insecure.

So whenever we wander off, we gently encourage ourselves to “stay” and settle down. Are we experiencing restlessness? Stay! Discursive mind? Stay! Are fear and loathing out of control? Stay! Aching knees and throbbing back? Stay! What’s for lunch? Stay! What am I doing here? Stay! I can’t stand this another minute! Stay! That is how to cultivate steadfastness.

 

 


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    Last reviewed: 3 Oct 2012

APA Reference
Naumburg, C. (2012). “Just Stay” – Advice for Meditation and Parenting. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 24, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mindful-parenting/2012/10/just-stay-advice-for-meditation-and-parenting/

 

 

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