Archives for May, 2012 - Page 2

General

Congrats on Your Unfocused Mind (Part 2)

Another excerpt from "Attention Surplus" (which is "100 meditative propositions that reframe the concept of ADD from a strength- and empowerment-based perspective"):

[continued from Part 1]

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

28.  I repeat: your “attention deficit” is an attention surplus.

29.  Indeed, by not getting stuck on one thing, you manage to track many things.

30.  A distractible mind is an agile mind.

31.  A mind that cannot be distracted is a...
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Mindful Emotional Eating

3 Principles of Mindful Emotional Eating

You have two options in regard to emotional eating: you can try to eliminate it altogether or you can try to make better use of it by making emotional eating more conscious. The latter would be consistent with the goals of harm reduction, a humanistic form of psychotherapy that offers a pragmatic risk-reduction approach to managing problematic behaviors.

3 Principles of Mindful Emotional Eating

If becoming a mindful emotional eater is the goal you'd like to pursue, the following three principles will help you transition from mindlessly-reactive emotional eating to mindfully-conscious emotional eating in moderation:

1) when eating to cope with emotions, accept emotional eating as a legitimate coping choice, not a coping failure;

2) when eating to cope with emotions, follow a predictable eating ritual, with clear start and end points;

3) when eating to cope with emotions, remember that emotional eating does not have to mean emotional overeating.

Following these guidelines will help you approach emotional eating with a sense of control.

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General

Congrats On Your Unfocused Mind

An excerpt from "Attention Surplus" (which is "a hundred meditative thoughts that reframe the concept of ADD from a strength- and empowerment-based perspective"):

1. A focused mind is a closed mind: to pay attention to one thing is to ignore another thing.

3. Mind is one-track: to pay attention to “this” is to ignore “that.”

4. Attention is zero-sum: to see one thing is to be blind to another thing.

5. That’s how attention works.  And that is normal.

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