Inspirational Articles

To Love is to Struggle (Thank Goodness!)

Friday, January 16th, 2015

This morning in my Facebook travels, I came across this quote from Mr. (Fred) Rogers:

Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.

As my mentor, Lynn, often likes to remind me, the moment I set an intention towards achieving something, what comes up first are all the obstacles in between me and the full manifestation of that intention.

Fun.

Speaking of which, one ongoing intention I’ve been working towards for the last few years is learning to love unconditionally – myself and others.

So far, I am finding this very, very difficult.

There are several challenges (and here, I also have to mention that these challenges are just the ones I know of thus far!): 


The Year of Living Intuitively

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

shutterstock_3193588So yesterday morning was New Year’s Day….my FAVORITE day of each new year.

Even though, technically, January 1 is just one day in a year full of days, for me, it always feels reliably fresh and special.

This particular New Year’s Day feels especially fresh and special because it ushers in some big changes in my life (more about that in my next post!)

To celebrate, I decided to sleep in and meditate for as long as I felt moved to do so – no rushing myself through it so I could rise and do “more important things.”

I’m so glad I did, because my New Year’s Intention was right there and waiting for me.

My meditation revealed that, for me, 2015 is “The Year of Living Intuitively.”

This makes perfect sense, because I am stepping out of some long-term career commitments and into new unknown beginnings.


Your Journey is Well Worth Your Effort

Monday, December 29th, 2014
Celebrating the arrival of a whole new year with my fav feathery sidekick!

Celebrating the arrival of a whole new year with my fav feathery sidekick!

Well here we are – once again, it is nearly time for a brand new year to launch!

I always get so excited when a new year arrives.

It feels like encountering a giant blank chalkboard, complete with the most marvelous array of colored chalk.

The chalkboard is all mine – as is the chalk. Whatever I draw on the chalkboard is what will unfold in the year to come.

(By the way, I actually do this at home – I have a big wall-sized chalkboard and lots of colored chalk, and all year long I continue editing and adding new dreams to my chalk board).

I can thank my ongoing recovery journey for this wonderful way of welcoming a new year.


You are Living Proof that Gratitude Heals

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014
One of my many mentors and "gratitude teachers."

One of my many mentors and “gratitude teachers” (my baby tortoise, Malti)

I used to dread the month of November.

And not just because of all the scary F.O.O.D.

I dreaded it because November is the “month of gratitude.”

I so wanted to be grateful – to feel grateful – to feel _genuinely_ grateful (as opposed to “faking it until you make it” grateful).

I wanted to be that kind of good person who could feel totally, deeply grateful for life’s blessings….without simultaneously wishing for so much more than what I had.

For instance – I wanted to be healthy. I wanted to be happy. I wanted to have friends (besides my eating disorder, that is!).

I wanted to be able to sit down and enjoy a festive meal with loved ones free from fear.

I wanted to like what I saw in the mirror.

I wanted to love and be loved – to fall in love – to have romance and peace and joy and fulfillment in my life.

So I would start listing out the things I was grateful for, only to be confronted by this other list of all the things I felt I desperately wanted and needed that would never be mine.

In a word….PAIN. 


What I Need to Feel Truly Human

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

shutterstock_79866124I recently returned from our family’s annual pilgrimage to Cape Cod.

Cape Cod is my favorite place on Earth.

I can learn more there, unwind more there, rest more there, restore more there, in just 24 hours than in 24 days back in my hometown of Houston, Texas (or anyplace else, for that matter).

This year – my fourth year of visiting the Cape – I have finally begun to detect the reason why.

Here at the Cape, and especially in the small town of Truro where we stay (Truro is the most remote town on the Cape itself), the ratio of nature to humanity is much more balanced.

In other words, here, human beings are in the distinct minority.

There are 100 trees to every one human, and nearly as many wild turkeys, dogs, and assorted wild birds in similar ratios.

Same holds true for sea life.

In fact, much of the Cape is made up of national parks and reserves – places where wildlife merit much stricter protections than man.

For this same reason, Park Rangers are a big fixture here – and yes, they do wear the traditional green and khaki outfits, complete with hats that would make Smoky the Bear proud.

During tourist season, the Park Rangers lead all kinds of nature walks and talks. During these events, they like to tell tourists, “when you enter the sea, you enter the food chain.” 


Finding Your “Formula”

Monday, November 10th, 2014

shutterstock_74587597The older I get, the more perspective I gain about what works for me – and also what doesn’t.

For instance, trying to manage the stressors of life by using eating disordered behaviors doesn’t work.

Drinking caffeine all day to keep my energy level at a consistent “high” doesn’t work.

Ruminating excessively on all possible “worst case scenario” outcomes doesn’t work.

Taking handfuls of over-the-counter mood management supplements doesn’t work.

These are just a few examples.

What works for me is quite simple: medication + meditation.

Specifically in that order.

Meditation without medication offers some benefits, as does medication without meditation.

But together, they have forged an alliance that has given me a quality of life I had no thought possible.


How to Be Important

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

shutterstock_220487410Recently, I happened across a post on marine ecologist and author Carl Safina’s website called “How to Be Important After Graduation (Anytime Really).”

I wish I could remember anything – even a single word – our commencement speaker shared the day I graduated.

If any of the words had been these words, I know I would still remember them.

Carl begins his speech by saying “graduation is always a joyful time.”

It wasn’t joyful for me.

It was scary, and strange, and artificial.

I felt lonely and very much unprepared.

I wasn’t ready for any of it, but it wouldn’t wait any longer. I could hear it in the background stamping its increasingly impatient little foot, telling me I’d better hurry up and get ready….”or else.”

Terrifying.


Your Body is Worth Getting to Know

Thursday, October 30th, 2014
Nothing feels quite so wonderful as suddenly discovering the power of your own WINGS!

Nothing feels quite so wonderful as suddenly discovering the power of your own WINGS!

I was in my late 20’s, and well into my struggles with anorexia and bulimia, before I began to perceive a tangible difference between “my body” and “me.”

After so many years of casually speaking about “my body,” “my mind,” “my heart,” “my spirit,” I finally started to wonder just who the “my” was who claimed all of these things.

Who owned “my body?”

Who was in charge of “my mind?”

Who sensed the presence of “my heart?”

Who was it who spoke of “my spirit” with such confidence?

Well, it must be …. “me.”

All at once, I became deeply curious about just who this “me” was who rated a body, a mind, a heart, a spirit all her own.


How to Dodge Despair and Lure Hope

Monday, October 27th, 2014

shutterstock_165376283With this post, I return again to that literal tome of life wisdom, “Voyage of the Turtle” by Carl Safina.

I have always learned so much from my animal companions….and continue to do so each and every day.

I also love watching nature documentaries that follow animals during their day-to-day lives so I can learn.

Sometimes while I’m watching these programs I think, “Oh, no, I could never eat termites for lunch!” and that is that.

At other times, the documentary reveals something so profound….a shared sense of deep and timeless, well, humanity – only the species I share it in common with is not technically “human.”

At a particular point in Safina’s book, he is describing the despair researchers have often felt as they have battled against humanity, global warming, inertia (from the general public, interested parties, and other scientists), and the suffering of the sea turtles themselves to maintain the hope for species regeneration.

He writes:

All the senior professionals…..they all work from hope. They’re not the types to gloss over problems or look through rose-tinted lenses. Quite the opposite; they’ve been the first to sound alarms. They’ve felt despair and fought despite it. I’ve learned this by observing the real professionals who go the distance. You dodge despair by not taking the deluge of problems full-bore. You focus on what can work, what can help, or what you can do, and you seize it, and then – you don’t let go. What they see, and what I’ve come to see, is the possibility of making things better. That’s what hope is: the belief that things can get better. The world belongs to people who don’t give up. (emphasis added)

But wait – it gets even better:


Do What You Can and Don’t Worry About the Odds Against You

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

VoyageofTurtleREV31-197x300I have been blogging a bit about a fabulous book called “Voyage of the Turtle” by Carl Safina.

At some point, this book has become less about gaining a simple “tortoise education” and more about learning how to simply live life.

In one of my favorite quotes, the author writes (this about watching a single baby sea turtle enter the surf for the first time, encouraged in its first steps by a group of witnessing conservationists):

I wonder if this is the end of something ancient or the start of a future regained. I’m not certain what it is, but I know what it means: it means there truly is hope. Other peoples, other species, even other kinds of sea turtles – in situations as bad, sometimes worse – have recovered. Turtles have taught me this: Do all you can and don’t worry about the odds against you. Wield the miracle of life’s energy, never worrying whether we may fail, concerned only that whether we fail or succeed we do so with all our might. That’s all we need to know to feel certain that all our force of diligent effort is worth our while on Earth. (emphasis added)

So beautiful!

And in fact, I told myself this very thing (although not so eloquently) when I first began my mighty struggle to recover from anorexia and bulimia.

The odds seemed powerfully stacked against me – leaning over me like a slobbering muscular bully, in fact.

My “support team” was minimal – one mentor, and me.

I had no money for therapy – inpatient, outpatient, or any other kind.

No one – least of all me – really understood what was wrong with me or how to fix it.

And I wasn’t yet fully convinced that what was wrong was a “something” – that it wasn’t just me, consummate failure at life and all things.

Yet I had nothing but time at that point, and I wanted to try. 


 

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