gossipcrpdLast week I mentioned I am knee-deep in don Miguel Ruiz’s latest book, “The Fifth Agreement.”

I also mentioned I didn’t understand most of it (except for presence, which you can read about here.)

But there is one other concept – thank goodness – that I found fairly easy to immediately grasp and put to use. This is Ruiz’s concept of what he calls “language types.” In “The Fifth Agreement”, Ruiz and his co-author (and son, and fellow shaman) don Jose Ruiz explain that there are three types of languages that we human beings tend to use.

These are the three types:

  • Gossip
  • Warrior
  • Truth

The gossip language type doesn’t need any explanation, really. We can tell when somebody else is gossiping to us or about us. And we can tell when we are gossiping about others or ourselves (interestingly, Ruiz & Ruiz say that most of our gossip is actually about ourselves).

The warrior language type has good intentions but tends to get far too invested in whatever is being spoken. When we use warrior language, sometimes our words are truthful and sometimes they are not. We also have a hard time telling which is which, or figuring out what word choice has to do with how much we enjoy our life….or don’t. (In terms of a progression, warrior language speakers are doing a bit better than the gossip speakers, but they can still do a whole lot better too.)

The truth language type sounds more like silence, apparently. People who speak the language of truth don’t need to speak much, and when they do speak their words always carry the power of truth.

Here is where the Fifth Agreement itself starts to feel a bit less confusing to me too, because when you take that Agreement, “be skeptical, but learn to listen” and put it up against each language type, it is pretty clear which type(s) you might want to watch out for….or seek out.

Today’s Takeaway: Ruiz & Ruiz state that all human beings are programmed to gossip. And that warrior language is our first step away from the unpleasant gossip language we came pre-programmed with. Where do you see yourself in these three language types? What are your goals for how you choose and use your words? Perhaps Ruiz’s teachings can help you meet those goals.

Gossip photo available from Shutterstock

 


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    Last reviewed: 8 Apr 2013

APA Reference
Cutts, S. (2013). What Our Words Have to Teach Us. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 28, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mentoring-recovery/2013/04/what-our-words-have-to-teach-us/

 

 

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