There are all kinds of mentors, in all walks of life.

Some mentors focus on supporting their mentees as newlyweds. Others mentor their mentees throughout their career. Still other mentors will serve and support mentors in the recovery arena.

At the end of the day, all that matters is - did we get a little bit closer to the goal of RECOVERY?

Mentors like me, who have recovered from an eating disorder, spend our mentoring hours supporting mentees who are still struggling to recover from eating disorders.

One of the most popular topics, if “popular” is the right word, in eating disorders mentoring is weight.

Weight gain, weight loss, what contributes to one or both, how to avoid one and promote the other, what to do when you want to have your eating disorder (i.e. weight loss or weight gain) and recovery too……

This is why, at least in my mentoring work, I do not talk about weight loss or weight gain with my mentees.

It is not productive.

To my mind, weight fluctuations are a symptom and an outcome – which means that, oddly enough, they are not technically a part of the actual process of recovery.

The recovery process, when working properly, will use both medical and non-medical supports to synthesize an environment in which whatever weight correction that is needed in order for recovery to take place can happen.

In other words, when the patient/mentee feels safe and supported, it is more likely that whatever weight-related issues need to be addressed can be addressed with less resistance and fear.

But mentoring is in its essence non-medical and non-clinical, and it is NOT about the weight.

Mentoring is about the mentee.

Mentoring is about addressing whatever stands between the mentee and their ability to successfully take care of their body, mind, heart, and spirit.

Today’s Takeaway: Whether you are a mentor, a mentee, or both (I’m still both myself!), where do you find yourself getting bogged down in discussions about symptoms or outcomes rather than focusing on the unspoken obstacles and opportunities that need to be addressed before one can subside and the other can arise?

 


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    Last reviewed: 6 Sep 2011

APA Reference
Cutts, S. (2011). Weight Loss, Weight Gain and Mentoring. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 24, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mentoring-recovery/2011/09/weight-loss-weight-gain-and-mentoring/

 

 

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