plateLet’s face it, America is fat.  Other countries might also suffer from weight issues, but America takes the cake. Literally.

What are we doing wrong?  Everything.  It’s hard to maintain a right diet when you go to a restaurant and your plate looks like it has servings for an entire family.  When everything is supersize, you lose reality.

I went to the Coffee Bean recently and ordered my usual Tropical Passion Ice Tea and the cashier said regular, large or Boom!  He pulled out a plastic cup the size of a Big Gulp.  I ordered the supersize thinking it was okay cause it was tea.  It’s not okay.

It’s not okay to train the brain to expect sizes bigger then your head.  I think that because it’s not some soft drink loaded with sugar that it’s not a problem; it’s tea, it’s healthy.  Then I go to the condiments bar and, instead of adding my usual one pack of raw sugar, I find myself using two packs to make up for the extra ounces of tea.

When supersize enters your healthy choices, it trains the brain to want more.  To expect more.

Stop.

It doesn’t matter if it’s tea, or sugar fueled Mountain Dew.  Your brain will become accustomed to a size, and ordering a small will be a foreign concept. So foreign that the cashier doesn’t even offer you a small.  And when they do, you look at it like what? I can drink that with two sips, not gulps, sips. So you toss that option aside.

Stop the madness, and find health in appropriate proportions.

Reasonable plate of food image available from Shutterstock.

 


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    Last reviewed: 28 Jun 2013

APA Reference
Loberg, E. (2013). Supersize Me, Literally: How to Stay Slim in a Fat World. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 2, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/manic-depression/2013/06/27/supersize-me-literally-how-to-stay-slim-in-a-fat-world/

 

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