Fat Check: Med Control IV

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

elbow240It stared me down, again. My antidepressant. And the guilt creeped in that I have not taken my medication for two days straight, and now it is day three. It is sad that I think I can monitor or check my weight gain, or not, in such a short amount of time. But, like I said before, it is really a mental thing where I feel better knowing I am not possibly throwing myself into the 20% that gain weight on this particular antidepressant.

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Fat Check: Med Control Part III

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

shutterstock_200321435I didn’t take my antidepressant today, and I know that is bad, and that I am jumping the gun. I got up super early to work out and was on a machine at the gym in front of a mirror and noticed that my arms were fat. I realize I just started my new diet five days ago which means it is impossible to have any visible results yet but, I freaked out over my chubby arms so have decided to chill on the antidepressant for a few days while I continue my new regime, and hope that I can lose a pound or two to make myself feel better, then go back on the med.

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Fat Check: Med Control Part II

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

scaleThe weekend did not pan out as I had planned, and my “new” diet pretty much blew up in my face. Like my usual manic self, I over did my expectations and made too many goals (3) that were too extreme to manage in my life right now. And all of this is to make sure I don’t gain weight taking an antidepressant that has a side effect of potential weight gain. Potential is scary enough for me to counteract with a new diet regime.

So my three goals or demands I put on myself were:

  1. No more chocolate Easter eggs
  2. No more late night eating
  3. No cheese

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Fat Check: Med Control Part I

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

easterI started an antidepressant several weeks ago, which happened to be around the same time Lent started and all those chocolate Easter eggs hit the shelves everywhere. So, I ate chocolate, which is usually the devils sin so have always stayed far away but, I indulged more or less.  Not a crazy amount, but Easter hit my ass, legs, thighs, and stomach. Or so I think. Or so maybe the new med added to my list of medications packed on a few pounds everywhere.

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A Mental Health Condition versus A Disease

By Erica Loberg • Less than a min read

shutterstock_242068039I’m not a pig, but I feel like a cow. I woke up and ate carne asada for breakfast. Well, it was around 11 am so technically it can be considered lunch but I’m still disgusting.

My mood is doing much better. My antidepressants are working. I hope not to be on them much longer cause I don’t want my body and mind to become accustomed to them. That would suck. So, for now I am taking my medication religiously and try not to think of the days when I only had one medication to stabilize my mood disorder.

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Video on Depression

By Erica Loberg • Less than a min read

Depression comes in many forms. Here is a sample of depression that I endure from time to time.

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Fox TV Series “Empire” takes on Bipolar Disorder: Race and Mental Illness

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

shutterstock_92578822Fox’s new hit Empire has taken on bipolar disorder as a storyline that discusses race and mental illness.

Here is a scene taken from Empire:

“Hey, hey everybody just hold on for a minute. What is this bipolar disorder? Cause you know that whack stuff with psychiatrist and music therapy and whatever this is. That’s white people’s problems see. Cause my baby strong. He is a lion. He can beat anything.”

“No. This isn’t a white person thing, Cookie.”

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Charlie Rose: The Brain Series on Aggression

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

shutterstock_257695930Recently on Charlie Rose: The Brain Series featured a panel of speakers discussing aggression. Here are a few quotes I pulled from the discussion which I believe are worthy of attention and conversation.

“The National Institutes of Health (NIH) does not want to fund aggression research at the level they fund fear or like they do for anxiety, depression. Because there is concern if we learn more about the biological nature of aggression that it will be used to stigma people as having a predisposition to violence. ”

This is a heavy statement that can be considered socially and politically controversial. When we discuss the brain and stigma with regards to behavior it crosses the line into a discussion about mental health.

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Cyberbullying & Depression

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

shutterstock_205134541What do you think of when you hear the word bully? I think of some big guy that teases and picks on the little guy on the playground, however, in today’s modern society with social media and Internet advancements, the word bullying has taken on a whole other realm on its own. A recent article on cnn.com discusses cyberbullying and its link to depression:

“The study found college girls who reported being cyberbullied were three times more likely to meet clinical criteria for depression. And if the cyberbullying was connected to unwanted sexual advances, the odds of depression doubled.”

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The Voice of Suicide in the Classroom

By Erica Loberg • 1 min read

shutterstock_111743345Recently, in local news in Los Angeles County, I read the following headline: Students Mourn El Dorado High School Teacher Found Hanging in Classroom. I proceeded to read the article on this tragedy and found two quotes worthy of examination.

Quote number one: “She always talked about how suicide was never the answer, that she had to deal with it,” the student said. “So just seeing this, it just makes you think what was wrong, like what happened to have her do this when she always talked about not doing it.”

There are a lot of articles about signs for people who are suicidal; many of which discuss how people hold back their sadness, or suicidal ideations, making it difficult to reach out. Suicide is voiced or not voiced in multiple situations. This particular quote from a student points to the other line of the spectrum. In this particular case the deceased repeatedly spoke out loud about not doing it.

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