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The Brain Does Not See The World As It is

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  1. I could not agree with this more. In my new book, “Who’s talking now, the owl or the Crocodile”, I help save relationships by exploring each persons past relationship with their parents. Through my research I found that the reason people respond the way they respond to situations is caused by the way their parents reacted to them when they were young. I help my patients realize this and then teach them how to overcome this behavior and see things in a different light. Thanks for sharing this!!

  2. I really like the title ‘The Brain Does Not See the World as it is” because it so succinctly puts as central a basic tenet of psychology. Freud called it the repetition compulsion. I especially like the example of the ‘liar”. I have had this in my practice and it is very challenging to get people to see another’s perspective when they feel they are being lied to. Especially when the other person feels they are ‘innocent” but when you can illuminate the underlying dynamics such as needing to please a mother who was unstable and potentally threatening then the lie can be illuminated. I also recommend Ellyn Bader’s book “we train our partners to lie to us” Not sure of the exact title but that’s the jist of it. Thanks for your contribution.

 

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