Buddha praying hands

We know that meditation is beneficial. It’s hard nowadays to escape the ever present pictures of the smiling Buddha, and the articles praising meditations efficacy, reaching from calming the mind to lowering blood pressure.

But how do we get ourselves to fit yet another chore that’s “good for you” into our schedule?

There are no easy answers, because if you want to turn a blind eye, you will. Just like with going to the gym. Or eating your vegetables.

But those of you who are willing to take a shot at it, there are a few tricks to help push yourself.

First and foremost: Forget that your mind will be quiet. It won’t. It takes many years of consistent practice to come to a place of emptiness of thought.

In the meantime, look at it this way: Your thoughts will not be eliminated, but they will slow down, and that in itself will feel like a relief.

Allow your thoughts to be chaotic. How can we expect perfection without any or little training? We don’t expect it when it comes to our bodies. Or our professional skills. We know that it takes hard work to come to a place of mastery.

But somehow we entertain this illusion that we should be able to control our minds just like that; and when we can’t, we feel bad, and nobody wants to feel bad. So all good intentions go out the window, and there’s not going to be any meditation.

Accept that the mind is busy. When we say “the brain just functions that way” it’s easier to allow this busyness than to think, “I can’t pull it off, I am a failure”.

No one can, when they first sit down.

Be prepared for your mind to trail off, and to lose focus. Over and over and over.

But if you sit just ten minutes in silence, you will have removed yourself from a lot of noise and obligations and stress. That in itself has a calming effect.

Make your meditation a routine activity. Do it in the morning. If you postpone it until bedtime, you’ll most likely never do it.

Integrate it into your day. Instead of pulling out your smart phone on the bus, just sit and close your eyes.

Find an external trigger to remind you to focus on your breath. For example, in the car, every time you stop at a red traffic light, keep your eyes on the light and breath deeply.

Begin to associate positive feelings with meditation. Shift your perspective from seeing it as a chore, to viewing it as something that makes you feel just a little bit lighter.

The mind is a powerful tool. Use it to your advantage.

 

photo credit: yago1.com

 


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    Last reviewed: 27 Sep 2012

APA Reference
Schoen, G. (2012). How To Get Yourself To Meditate. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 1, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/gentle-self/2012/09/how-to-get-yourself-to-meditate/

 

The Gentle Self Buddha Betrayed
Gerti Schoen is the author of The Gentle Self
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