Archive for September, 2012

How To Get Yourself To Meditate

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Buddha praying hands

We know that meditation is beneficial. It’s hard nowadays to escape the ever present pictures of the smiling Buddha, and the articles praising meditations efficacy, reaching from calming the mind to lowering blood pressure.

But how do we get ourselves to fit yet another chore that’s “good for you” into our schedule?

There are no easy answers, because if you want to turn a blind eye, you will. Just like with going to the gym. Or eating your vegetables.

But those of you who are willing to take a shot at it, there are a few tricks to help push yourself.

First and foremost: Forget that your mind will be quiet. It won’t. It takes many years of consistent practice to come to a place of emptiness of thought.

In the meantime, look at it this way: Your thoughts will not be eliminated, but they will slow down, and that in itself will feel like a relief.

Allow your thoughts to be chaotic. How can we expect perfection without any or little training? We don’t expect it when it comes to our bodies. Or our professional skills. We know that it takes hard work to come to a place of mastery.

But somehow we entertain this illusion that we should be able to control our minds just like that; and when we can’t, we feel bad, and nobody wants to feel bad. So all good intentions go out the window, and there’s not going to be any meditation.

Accept that the mind is busy. When we say “the brain just functions that way” it’s easier to allow this busyness than to think, “I can’t pull it off, I am a failure”.

No one can, when they first sit down.

Be prepared for your mind to trail off, and to lose focus. Over and over and over.

But if you sit just ten minutes in silence, you will have removed yourself from a lot of noise and obligations and stress. That in itself has a calming effect.

Make your meditation a routine activity. Do it in the morning. If you postpone it until bedtime, you’ll most likely …


How To Lose Your Inner Critic

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

tea with Everett True

It’s bad enough feeling anxious or depressed. But what makes the emotional pain so much worse, is that we can’t just accept what it going on inside our minds. We have to criticize ourselves for being afraid, angry, jealous and so on. That’s what really brings us down: the inner critic.

Let’s say something went wrong at work. One of your clients decided to go with another firm and you feel directly affected. It’s one thing to get over the loss of business. It means loss of income, loss of contacts, loss of reputation.

It wouldn’t be so bad to just let it go and be done with it.

But that’s usually not the end of the story. We start to feel that we should’ve known they weren’t happy; that it’s something we did wrong, and it’s solely our responsibility. We should’ve done this to prevent their leaving, and that to find a quick replacement.

We come down hard on ourselves and cannot possibly forgive that we can’t read other people’s minds, or potentially made a mistake. It’s unacceptable that we’re human, and humans can’t always know.

What’s needed in order to silence the self-critical voices in out head is self-compassion.

We need to look at ourselves with the benevolence and understanding we’d offer a child or a good friend. “Don’t worry so much”, we could say to ourselves. “You did everything you could. You worked your butt off, talked to everyone you could and made a big effort to make the client happy. Sometimes we can’t control all the factors, and I can’t know all the ins and outs of why they left our company.”

It’s important to put yourself in the shoes of someone who will talk you down from your self-blame and relentless criticism.

And it’s not just psychological strategy to get familiar with self-compassion; there are actual studies that have shown it’s positive affects.

New research concludes that self-compassion leads to “significant positive association with self-reported measures of happiness, optimism, positive affect, wisdom, personal initiative, curiosity and exploration, agreeableness, extroversion, and conscientiousness.”

If we can leave …


How To Deal With Shyness And Social Anxiety

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Shyness

Lots of people are shy. I am, kind of. It doesn’t come out as much, now that I don’t go to loud parties and crowded bars anymore. I prefer lunch dates and small dinner parties, and my social needs are fully met by being in quieter and smaller settings.

A big part of why people suffer so much around others is because they feel they should abide by certain social standards. Sometimes they’re not even aware that they don’t like particular forms of gathering.

Some college students (or former college students) prefer to binge drink rather than admit to themselves that they feel awkward around people they don’t know very well. The alcohol kills all anxiety and serves as a social lubricant in order to feel more comfortable.

Sometimes it’s possible to stick to a limit of one or two drinks that hold them over all night. A moderate amount of alcohol can work well to calm the anxiety without being excessive. Unfortunately, many people can’t stop once there’s a mild buzz, especially when everybody else is knocking down glass after glass.

The difficulty in trying to hold a conversation when in the grip of social anxiety, is the flightyness we communicate to others. We feel insecure about whether we have anything interesting to say, and this belief is openly displayed on our face, for everyone to spot.

Our gaze goes somewhere towards the other end of the room, our voice falters, maybe our whole body is turned inwards or away. We start thinking about our own awkwardness rather than what we’re trying to say, and come across as flighty and unfocussed.

This is often what makes the person we’re trying to talk to lose interest, or wonder what’s going on. If we ourselves don’t believe that what we have to say is worthwhile, then others will do just the same.

The key to dealing with this anxiety is presence and awareness. As soon as we begin to focus intently on what we’re trying to communicate and how it’s going to be received, there’s a whole different emphasis on the connection between the two people involved …


Taking On Other People’s Opinions

Saturday, September 15th, 2012

Boundary Wall - Mirium Regia (1)

One of my clients came in the other day and was quite upset. About herself.

“Why can’t I just stick to my guns?” she asked aghast.

It’s something that happens to her quite frequently. She thinks she has an opinion about something, but as soon as someone else explains why they think differently, she sways over to the other side.

“It bothers me that I am so understanding” she concluded.

Indeed, her understanding of others regularly makes her forget her own point of view.

It’s the old story: it’s hard to just say no, put up a boundary and side with one’s own experience. Whenever another influence appears, your own position takes a back seat. We call it self defeat.

Of course, there is always the need for balance. Someone who blindly and continually insists on their point of view is not well adjusted either. Unevenness towards either side – too little consistence or too much – is undesirable.

We need to remember to put up a firm boundary towards others when we feel that we are taken over too easily.

How do we do that?

Awareness is the key, as always. When do you tend to get swept away by others? In a certain social setting, with your in-laws, your wife’s girlfriends, your high school buddies, your doctor?

People in authority have the most power over us – whether it’s a domineering relative, a store clerk or a cop. Any kind of uniform will usually do the trick.

Observe yourself when your determination begins to soften and the other person wins out just by the sheer volume of their words or their voice.

Put both feet on the ground, straighten your posture and stay firm.

Your have come to your own conclusions, and they are worth no less than anybody else’s.

photo credit: Choufani


Letting Go

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Set me free !!!
Letting go isn’t easy. Our tendency is to hold on to our hurt, our convictions, our attachments, and our belief that we are right.

Recently, one of my patients insisted that her boyfriend be able to read her every desire from her eyes. As she contemplated what it would be like to let go of this habit, she asked a question that gets to the heart of letting go: “Do you want to be right or do you want to he happy?”

We all have our attachments.

We get attached to the idea that our spouses should know exactly what our needs are. We get attached to knowing our way to work and get pissed off when the road is blocked. We get attached to things always going our way and feel stifled when they don’t.

Sometimes we have to literally let go of a relationship that is no longer a good idea.

When a friendship has run its course and feels chronically stale or exhausting. When an ex is moving on with his life and doesn’t have time for us anymore. When a relative is destroying himself with drugs or alcohol and we realize that we only sustain the addiction.

Life is difficult at times. There is no one who is spared. Pain is necessary so we can appreciate the joy of life. There is not one without the other.

The earlier we can accept that, the less we will suffer. Only then can we be free.

 

photo credit: Rakesh JV


Stop Worrying About What Others Think

Saturday, September 8th, 2012

headache
We all do it to some extent.

“What if my boss saw me do xyz and starts thinking less of me?”

“My brother-in-law made a snide remark about our cousin, what if he talks badly about me as well?”

“I overheard my mom saying I look fat in that dress, I feel terrible.”

Other people’s opinions can wreak havoc on our self esteem. We take their judgements at face value and allow a careless remark to torture us for a long time.

To some degree, the attitudes in our most important social groups provide orientation and structure. It’s not that we shouldn’t care about anybody’s opinion at all. But we also shouldn’t let somebody dominate our mental well being.

Self doubt is one of the most destructive forces for our sense of self. If another person plants the seed of self doubt in our minds and we get stuck in it, we may very well end up in a depression.

When you feel the effects of someone else’s words get to you, put up an mental barrier around yourself. Imagine a protective shield go up that prevents any negative influence from getting to you.

If it gets out of hand, remove yourself from the source of negativity.

Remember, it’s nothing but a person’s opinion. We give others authority over whether their remark get through to us. We have the power to reject them or allow them to find their way in.

Look at the larger picture. Considering the sphere of your town, your country, our whole planet, one small person’s words mean nothing.

Imagine you are an astronaut, looking back at the earth from space. This view renders all chatter, all the self importance of small minds meaningless.

It’s up to you what you want to do with it.

 

photo credit: gagilas


“Serendipitous Discovery” Of News

Monday, September 3rd, 2012

An old newspaper

Reading news online can lead to a “serendipitous discovery” of news items that would otherwise go unnoticed, according to a study of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

The research says that people who are doing unrelated things, like shopping or checking email online, unintentionally come across links for new items that they would otherwise not have noticed.

The discovery is used as a reason why newspapers should advertise for their articles on vastly differing content sites for accidental readers to be found.

I’m not so sure if that is such a good thing. While it may be good for online media to find new readers, it doesn’t serve to expose people to a wider array of knowledge.

Looking at my own news consumption, I find myself more drawn to pithy headlines about celebrity news and pragmatic How-To-articles, rather than being exposed to unexpected background information the way traditional newspapers often do.

I have to make a conscious effort not to fall into the trap of wanting to click on yet another article about the benefits of antioxidants (which I am already quite aware of), or what sexy dress actress XYZ was showing off that day.

I miss being pointed towards a news item in an actual paper newspaper that I wouldn’t have picked by myself, but found stimulating when I read it. Online, there’s so many choices that I quickly skip over the less catchy headlines, at the price of missing out on the potentially educational effect of a story that isn’t quite as sexy at first sight.

Maybe I should go back to the good old newspaper subscription. I’m thinking about it.

 

 

photo credit: sermoa


The Gentle Self Buddha Betrayed
Gerti Schoen is the author of The Gentle Self
and her latest book, Buddha Betrayed. Check them
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