Archives for Depression

Depression

Untreated Depression During Pregnancy – Part 2

This week I'm highlighting recent expert opinions on untreated depression during pregnancy. My post a few days ago highlighted a research paper stating that anti-depressants generally "do not provide clinically meaningful benefit to women with depression."

While a strongly disagree with that position, I am impressed by the number of non-medication therapies that are being researched or have already shown benefits for women with depression.

And now we...
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Depression

Inside the Depressed Mind

One of the more frequently read posts on the Family Mental Health blog is PMDD Hard to Endure Harder to Explain. I know many of you who have experienced any form of depression can find it difficult to describe what it's like inside your mind. Your fears about people believing you can be overwhelming. Plus, you may not feel like words come easily...
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Depression

Postpartum Depression – What Moms Really Want

Postpartum depression can rob the life out of a mother without her understanding what's happening.  It comes when mothers are most vulnerable. No mother should have to go through this hell, especially when she has a brand new life depending on her.

If I could just "fix" it, I would.  I'd snap my fingers and send depression on its way, leaving no trace of shame or despair behind.  Unfortunately, it often takes some real discomfort (and some time) to really put a finger on the problem.

Moms don't want to believe things are really that bad.  They don't want to be seen as bad mothers or as someone who'd be a danger to their baby.  Family members don't always know what's going on or how (or even if) they should try to help.

With the right help, a mom with postpartum depression can get better.  It may take a while before they feel like they can function and feel resilient, but it can happen.  Until then, these women often feel like they're wandering in the wilderness of their mind.
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Depression

Teen Depression and Resources To Help

This is a follow-up to the previous post about bullying and suicide risk in teens.  When highlighting that specific area of concern about our teen population, I thought it made sense to have some more detailed information and some solid resources.

Normal Moodiness and Support for Depression

Since teenage boys and girls are famous for their moodiness, it should come as no surprise that nearly 20% of teens will develop depression before they reach adulthood.  Doesn’t it make sense, though?  They’re exploring the many joys and hazards of romantic relationships (plus those unruly hormones), are trying to find their way between childhood and adulthood, while going through massive changes in their brain.
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Depression

Spouse Of A Depressed Person – Facing Tough Reality

Today I read a new comment on the post "When a Depressed Spouse Refuses Help" and was inspired to write a long response.  It got long enough that I decided to make it a separate post for everyone to see more easily.  The commenter talked about how tough it was to deal with a spouse that chose their depression over their family.  Their depression had almost become like a security blanket, something they wanted to be around more than their family.

This can actually be somewhat of a controversial topic.  I've read comments from both depressed people and from spouses.  People with depression want to have acceptance and for their spouses to be patient.  Spouses want their loved ones to take some action and accept their help so they can be a functioning family again.  And when it doesn't come together, families can split apart.
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Depression

Depression – It’s A Family Affair

Every now and then, I'm reminded just how connective mental health problems can be.  By that, I mean how much one person's depression can touch everyone else in their family.  Depression is truly a family affair.

Major Depression

Major depression can occur when you least expect it and with someone who hasn't had a history of depression before.  It could be triggered by a weather disaster, a medical diagnosis, moving far away, a sudden death in the family - really anything that requires a lot of adjustment.  If the person feels like they have little control over their circumstances, they may be even more vulnerable to a bout with depression.
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Depression

APA Blog Party – A Story Of Postpartum Depression and PMDD

Today I’m participating in the APA (American Psychological Association) Blog Party!  I’m going to take my turn by telling my postpartum depression story and share some thoughts on the general topic of mental health.

Depression Tough To Spot Even For a Professional

First, I am a licensed mental health counselor with a masters degree.  Second, I have experienced postpartum depression first-hand for a handful of years.  Both have enhanced my ability to help people through my writing work and my direct clinical work.  Would I relive my depression all over again?  Absolutely not, if I could help it.  But mental illness isn’t always what we think it is, even when you are a trained professional.

I had been working at my first counseling job about two years before I had my first child.  I had no history of depression, but I knew how to identify it in others.  During my postpartum period I found myself facing a sense of emptiness and struggle that I had never known.
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Depression

Babies With Depression – Is It Possible?

Last week I caught part of an article in Time Magazine called "Small Child, Big Worries." It focuses on a diagnostic manual developed by a non-profit child advocacy group called "Zero To Three."  It has descriptions of many major mental health disorders that afflict older children, teens, and adults.  This manual has been around for years, with a most recent revision done in 2005.

I'll be honest - I'm a little uncertain about this.  One, babies have limited communication skills to clarify what's going on in their mind.  Diagnosis would be almost completely done through behavioral observation.  Two, child temperament may account for some of the behaviors and emotional reactions that can define a mental illness.
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