I hope that people recognize the tongue-in-cheek nature of the title.  After working as a physician in various roles over a period of 20 years, I can state with absolute confidence that the answer to the question is ‘yes’.

I’ve written numerous times about the writer/activist for the Salem-News.com website, Marianne Skolek.  I don’t know if she writes for the print edition as well, but at any rate I somehow was planted on a mailing list that provides constant updates on what she calls the battle against Purdue and ‘big pharma’.

People with a stake in the outcome of this battle may want to stay current, and even see if their Senators are involved in the process.  The investigation was launched in early May, by the Senate Committee on Finance, and at this point has asked for documents from several pharmaceutical companies, including Purdue, the manufacturer of oxycontin– a medication that has become the focus for most of the wrath of those affected by opioid dependence.

The investigation will include a number of groups whose missions are (or in some cases, were) to advocate for pain relief, including the American Pain Foundation, the American Pain Society, the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the Federation of State Medical Boards, the University of Wisconsin Pain and Policy Studies Group and the Joint Commission.

I consider it part of the human condition, the way we push in one direction for some period of time, and then realize (with surprise!) that we pushed too far, and need to push back. Years ago I created a website called Warmal Globing, that includes a Newsweek article that caught my attention in the 1970′s, warning that an emerging ice age doomed the Earth.  Suggestions for saving the planet included covering the polar ice caps with soot, in order to absorb more of the sun’s precious heat– although the article pointed out that growing seasons had already been severely limited in most parts of the world, and famine was just around the corner.

We all know what happened to THAT disaster.  And then last week, Dr. James Lovelock, a leading doomsayer of the global warming movement, pointed out that many of the disastrous outcomes predicted by himself, featured in Al Gore’s movie, um…. haven’t happened…  and to the chagrin of many, he wrote that most of the disasters that were predicted are unlikely to occur.  Read for yourself.  Never before were so many people so disappointed by good news.

I’m running off topic, I know, but it is hard to observe the dramatic swing on pain relief without recognizing the broader pattern.  For those confused about the pain issue, you have reason to be confused.  About 15 years ago I worked as an anesthesiologist, when the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals made their 3-year site visit to our hospital.  Hospital administrators hired consultants to find out what THAT year’s big issue was— e.g. hospital acquired infections, patient privacy, rights of those with disabilities…. and found that the hot-button issue was ‘undertreatment of pain.’

Little diagrams were dispensed to every patient room, showing the smiley-face guy with an expression ranging from happy to miserable, in case a person was experiencing pain but unable to speak– allowing the person to point to the appropriate picture instead.  Key personnel were told to make it abundantly clear that we all take pain VERY seriously, and we do all in our power to avoid undertreatng because of, for example, fear of addiction.  Studies were widely cited that claimed that only 7% of people with true pain become addicted to opioids.

One or two textbooks became the authority on opioid prescribing, introducing a new term — pseudoaddiction– which refers to a condition of drug-seeking behavior caused by under-treating pain, rather than by true addiction.

I know that I have to pull all of this together at some point.  The easiest way for me to do that is by directing people to the latest article by Ms. Skolek, where she suggests that doctors have been influenced to promote narcotics because of grants from the pharmaceutical industry.  Similar accusations have been made by others, including a series of articles by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that accused the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine of promoting opioids in return for millions of dollars.

I respect the efforts of another group I’ve described– PROP, or Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing.   Their efforts have been promoted by Ms. Skolek to some extent, and vice versa.  I do not know of any formal relationship between PROP and Ms. Skolek.  But I hope that PROP’s efforts take a more reasoned approach than the latest article by Skolek, where she compares Purdue Pharma to Adolf Hitler.

Why?  Because among the many clinical trials by Purdue is one that studies the use of potent opioids like Oxycontin in children and teenagers.  Some of the most sobering experiences of my medical training were at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, providing care for brave, hairless children, knowing the years of pain that awaited them– if things went well.

I think I’ve provided enough background and links to start interested parties off on their own holiday reading. Yes, there is an epidemic of opioid dependence in this country and elsewhere. There are many reasons for this epidemic, and MOST of the reasons have nothing to do with the marketing tasks used by Purdue decades ago — for which they have paid dearly.

While there are clearly areas where opioids are over-prescribed, and in some cases grossly over-prescribed, it would be a shame if the current swing in regulatory sentiment takes us to the point where doctors are afraid to provide pain relief for people who are suffering.  This is already the case in some instances; people labelled as ‘addicts’, no matter the length of their remission, are likely to wait a long time for their first dose of narcotic, should they be unlucky enough to develop a kidney stone.

I’ve spent a great deal of time and energy defending those poor souls, and discovered, sadly, that most doctors just don’t care about the pain experienced by recovering addicts.  But there is a saying, also often referenced to the Holocaust, referring to mistreatment of others being ignored, until eventually similar mistreatment is directed at those who didn’t care about others.  There are times when attempts to ‘cure’ go too far.  Suggesting that methods of pain relief should not be investigated, clarified, and perfected for children is going a bit too far.

 


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    Last reviewed: 9 Jul 2012

APA Reference
Junig, J. (2012). Can Children Have Pain?. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 23, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/epidemic-addiction/2012/07/can-children-have-pain/

 

 

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