Archive for July, 2012

Tolerate THIS, Part II

Sunday, July 29th, 2012

epidemic of addictionI have been struggling with Part II, primarily because there are no easy answers to the situation.  I realize that I could easily criticize whichever path a doctor suggests for our imaginary patient.

As an aside, I believe that a major reason for the lack of sufficient prescribers of buprenorphine in some parts of the country is the ‘damned if I do, or damned if I don’t’ scenario.  All docs are aware of the current epidemic of opioid overdose deaths, and I think most doctors assume that tighter regulations on opioids are appropriate, and are just around the corner.

Some addiction physicians and some pain physicians, particularly those who prescribe opioids, fear being grouped by the media, DEA, or a licensing board as part of the problem, rather than as part of the solution.  I recently read of a doctor charged with manslaughter for being one of several prescribers for a person who died from opioid overdose. He prescribed meperidine—an outdated and toxic medication—which likely contributed to the charges, but the story creates a chilling atmosphere, regardless.

Suboxone and buprenorphine are much safer medications, but when the target population consists of people with addictions to opioids, there will always be some people who use the medication inappropriately— some with disastrous results.


Tolerate THIS

Monday, July 16th, 2012

pillsI recently accepted a young man as a patient who was addicted to hydrocodone (the opioid in Vicodin), prompting a discussion about treatment options for someone who hasn’t been using very long, and who hasn’t pushed his tolerance all that high.  Perhaps it will be informative to share my thought process when recommending or planning treatment in such cases.

In part one I’ll provide some background, and in a couple days I’ll follow up with a few more thoughts on the topic.

Most people who have struggled with opioids learn to pay attention to their tolerance level—i.e. the amount of opioid that must be taken each day to avoid withdrawal or to cause euphoria (the latter about 30% more than the former).  For someone addicted to opioids, the goal is to have a tolerance of ‘zero’—meaning that there is no withdrawal, even if the person takes nothing.

That zero tolerance level serves as a goal, making having a high tolerance a bad thing, and pushing tolerance lower a good thing.


Can Children Have Pain?

Wednesday, July 4th, 2012

I hope that people recognize the tongue-in-cheek nature of the title.  After working as a physician in various roles over a period of 20 years, I can state with absolute confidence that the answer to the question is ‘yes’.

I’ve written numerous times about the writer/activist for the Salem-News.com website, Marianne Skolek.  I don’t know if she writes for the print edition as well, but at any rate I somehow was planted on a mailing list that provides constant updates on what she calls the battle against Purdue and ‘big pharma’.

People with a stake in the outcome of this battle may want to stay current, and even see if their Senators are involved in the process.  The investigation was launched in early May, by the Senate Committee on Finance, and at this point has asked for documents from several pharmaceutical companies, including Purdue, the manufacturer of oxycontin– a medication that has become the focus for most of the wrath of those affected by opioid dependence.

The investigation will include a number of groups whose missions are (or in some cases, were) to advocate for pain relief, including the American Pain Foundation, the American Pain Society, the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the Federation of State Medical Boards, the University of Wisconsin Pain and Policy Studies Group and the Joint Commission.


 

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Recent Comments
  • J.T. Junig, MD, PhD: The correct answer to your question is seldom realized (or believed) by doctors…. but yes,...
  • Maureen: First let me say I have just started on Suboxone and the info I have found here is great, so thank you....
  • J.T. Junig, MD, PhD: The studies often quoted by the anti-buprenorphine fanatics are retrospective and highly flawed....
  • Darlene Moak: Thank you thank you thank you for writing that buprenorphine (Subutex) is no more likely to be abused...
  • The cure is the cause: I agree, it is so important to research any new medications one is taking of this class, ie:...
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