Archives for Emotion Skills - Page 2

Borderline Personality Disorder

Four Ways to Increase Your Interpersonal Skills


Emotionally sensitive people experience more intense emotions that are more easily aroused and that last longer than those who are not emotionally sensitive. You react faster with greater emotional intensity that lasts longer. Your emotional reactions can be triggered by television shows, magazine articles, places that trigger memories, anniversaries and other events.  Interpersonal issues are one of the most challenging areas for you.

With a strong fear and sensitivity to rejection, even routine events such as a friend canceling lunch plans can bring on a tornado of emotions that are difficult to manage. With this difficulty in relationships, so much of life becomes stressful, such as attending classes, dating, participating in friendships, interacting in group activities, having roommates, and working with others. Some of you withdraw and become isolated as a way of avoiding the pain of relationships. Others experience anguish and suffering on a regular basis with little relief. Working on interpersonal skills and ways to manage emotions in relationships can help you reduce the suffering you experience on a daily basis. Improving your interpersonal resiliency and skills is complicated.  Four options for getting started (based on the work of Marsha Linehan, 1993)  include the following:

Continue Reading

Emotion Regulation

Emotional Secrets





Do you have a secret you are keeping?  Perhaps a secret about something that is extremely emotionally upsetting to you? Events you experience that are shameful, traumatic, or embarrassing are often kept secret. Yet any major upheaval that you keep hidden from others can compromise your physical and mental health.

There are many reasons that emotional secrets can be so damaging. When you don't talk about an upsetting event, you may ruminate and have difficulty letting go and moving on. Ruminating usually brings intense misery. Keeping a secret about a major event changes your relationships. You can no longer talk as openly with friends and family as you did before the secret. The secret builds a wall between you. You are always on guard, careful to not say anything that would give your secret away. You may hold yourself back too, not wanting to get too close with anyone for fear you might want to share what happened to you. You may not feel worthy of close relationships, feeling that you are tainted or flawed as a person. Perhaps you see yourself separate and different from others and have lost the sense of belonging you once had.
Continue Reading

Borderline Personality Disorder

Make a Difference: Accept Your Emotional Sensitivity

 

Emotionally sensitive people are among the most compassionate and passionate people in the world. Often creative, you have talents as artists, writers, and musicians. You add to the caring and beauty of the world. Many times you also struggle with self-hatred, depression, anxiety, and horrible feelings of alienation. Those struggles are likely not due to your being emotionally sensitive. Much of your suffering may come from self-doubt and from an agonizing experience of being broken. That likely comes from what you are told and experience as a child.

Continue Reading

Coping Skills

An Epidemic of Urgency

 

Urgency means requiring swift action and seems to include a nuance of importance. If something is urgent, it is important and needs to be done quickly. Somehow my urgency sensor is stuck in the "on" position. I perceive urgency and react as if my activity is critically urgent when all I'm doing is going to the grocery store or taking a shower. I  feel pressure that time is passing and I'm not going to get it all done, or won't get it done on time.  What "all" is and why it has to be done is not clear, if I even consider it.  When I drive to the office, there's an urgency to get there on time. When I'm going through my day, there's an urgency keep to the schedule. When I'm at the gym, I am focused on getting the workout done so I can get on to the next activity.

Continue Reading

Coping Skills

Learning from Gamers: Making Reality More Rewarding


Many youth and young adults are immersed in virtual worlds and online games. They spend every possible moment using their skills and ingenuity to get to the next level of complex multiplayer games. Your attempts to get them to spend time offline are met with strong resistance and may be doomed.

Jane McGonigal, in her book Reality is Broken:  Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World points out that games offer a sense of being fully alive, focused and engaged in every moment. Games offer a sense of power, heroic purpose and community as well as the thrill of success and team victory. Games were designed to maximize interest and motivation with no personal attacks. Games are inspiring and create a sense of community. Games satisfy the hunger for more satisfying work and a sense of a more engaging life.

Continue Reading

Emotion Skills

Emotional Bruising


 

When you are emotionally sensitive, getting through each day can feel like walking through a carnival full of interesting booths and people but alert to small dangers everywhere. The path is uneven, people are running in the crowds without looking where they are going, some of the games are rigged and mosquitos are buzzing around ready to bite. While most people barely register these issues, they can ruin the day for you. Someone making an off-hand comment, being criticized, learning that a friend didn't invite you to join her and other friends for a movie, a boyfriend breaking a date--all are painful for you. While it's not I-can't-stand-it kind of pain, it's enough to create difficult feelings of sadness and rejection, even when you know these routine events happen to everyone and weren't meant to harm you. At the end of most days you're covered with emotional bruises. And those bruises add up.

Emotional bruises are those hurts that make it more difficult to get through the day and bring your mood down. You're tired and wounded--know the feeling?

Continue Reading

Coping Skills

Everyday Ways We Fail to Be Mindful





Mindfulness has been shown to improve our mood, reduce stress, improve our performance and reduce pain. Part of mindfulness is to accept the present moment as it is, to be fully present. Practicing mindfulness as we go about our daily routine can be a challenge.  One of those challenges is in accepting reality as it is. This is often particularly difficult for emotionally sensitive people who experience the emotions of life so intensely.

Continue Reading

Borderline Personality Disorder

Anxiety and Avoidance


Perhaps you agree to give a presentation, play the piano for your friend's wedding, or go on a trip to a foreign country. Not long after you commit you are filled with anxiety and wish you had never agreed.  Maybe even leaving your house causes you anguish, worrying about what others think of you. In these situations you are worrying about an event that has not happened, but might happen.

When you suffer from a life event that could have been avoided, you may be angry with yourself. For example, whenever you lose a loved pet or experience the break up of a relationship, you might say, "Never again. It's not worth it." You worry about feeling that pain in the future.

Continue Reading