Archives for Living with Depression - Page 2

Alcoholism

Depression, obsession and rumination

I once heard a guy say that he tries to wear his life like a comfortable old t-shirt. I like that and I've been trying to do it lately but I think I must have shrunk that t-shirt in the dryer because it's tight as hell right now.

From the outside you might not notice that my comfy t-shirt has morphed into a corset. But from the inside, it feels like it has. I'm carrying around this intensity right now - for work, for working-out and even for finishing the entire seven-season series Sons of Anarchy.

I am driven. I can't seem to slow down my thoughts. One thought leads to another and another and another. It makes me good at what I do - newspaper reporting - but it's not good for my mental health. It's a constant tugging - intellectually I want to slow down - instinctually I want to speed up.
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Coping with Depression

Father forgive me for I have sinned and have depression

I am guilty. I'm not sure what I'm guilty of but I'm certain I am guilty. I was brought up Catholic and went to a Catholic elementary school.

The nuns taught us about the different kinds of sins - venial sins, a sort of lesser gateway sin that wouldn't send us directly to hell, unlike mortal sins - like killing someone - which would send us directly to hell. You would burn in hell for eternity no matter how many Hail Mary's you said. Of course, as second- and third-graders, we hadn't committed any mortal sins but they were out there.

And there were those poor little babies who died before they were baptized. They ended up in limbo - heaven's waiting room. They didn't get into heaven because there original sin hadn't been washed away by pouring some water over their little heads. So, your parents better get your little brother baptized or he could END UP IN LIMBO!!!

I got so scared of being bad and had convinced myself that I WAS bad that as soon as I was able,, I went to confession.  In fact, I went to confession so much that they told me I didn't  have to go so much - which was a huge relief because as a little kid I had better things to do than keep a running tally of my venial sins.

I haven't gone to confession in years. I like to think I dial direct. When I feel guilty, which is still a lot, I deal directly with God.
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Coping with Depression

Circling the drain of depression

Two down, one to go.

We made it through Thanksgiving and Christmas. There's just New Year's left. I can see the finish line but I'm close to bonking. Yes, I am taking my medications. I am exercising and getting plenty of sleep. I am eating well - except for the gluten-free Pop Tarts.

I thought I had done a pretty good job of fending off my depression this year. I didn't buy a tree or put out any decorations until about 2 hours before my daughter came home to visit. I cancelled my satellite television service and got Roku - so I wasn't bombarded by holiday commercials.

I didn't turn on the radio and made it through my first holiday season without hearing that insanely annoying Feliz Navidad song - although I did hear Paul McCartney's "Sim-ply Hav-ing a Wonderful Christmas Time," which is equally annoying.
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Coping with Depression

For holiday orphans, depression is real

I have made it 55 years without cooking a turkey. I used to be ashamed of that fact. How could a one-time wife and mother get this far in life without ever having made a turkey?

It's a sad story with a happy ending. I don't have much family and the family I have don't invite me to holiday dinners. They're either too far away, or they don't know me because we haven't kept in contact over the decades or they don't invite me to their dinner table. 

When I was married we managed to get invited to my in-laws for holiday meals. My ex-husband is in the restaurant business so he was usually working. When we divorced, it was just my daughter and me. A few times I made a turkey breast and we got dressed up, took out the good china and some candles and had a nice little holiday meal - just the two of us and the dog.

We are holiday orphans. No cousins, aunts, uncles, parents, grandparents, siblings. Just me, my daughter and the dog. When my daughter was much younger and still a believer (in Santa) we had fun - baking cookies, decorating the tree and building a runway in the yard with blue and red lights for Santa to land.

For a few years I had other orphans to my house on Christmas Eve. Fun, but a lot of work and money for a single mom with a full-time job. Then my daughter grew up and spent holidays with friends who have real families. Of course the two of us still eat dinner together on Christmas Eve but we no longer build the runway in the front yard or bake cookies together.
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Coping with Depression

Can depression help your career?

A good headline, like a lot of good things in life, will suck you in. This one got me: "How business leaders can use fatigue and depression to their advantage."

Do tell, I thought, because I've been in the working world for more than 30 years and I've yet to meet a boss, supervisor or leader who has used fatigue and depression to their advantage. On the planet where I live, depression and fatigue are weaknesses.

Come to think of it, I have never encountered a boss supervisor or leader who ever had to take time off from work because depression or fatigue. That's only something us worker bees do. So, I had to read this article by Andrew Cave, published on the Forbes web site on Wednesday.

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Living with Depression

Robin Williams: Celebrity vs non-celebrity suicide

Robin Williams.

Ernest Hemingway. Kurt Cobain. Marilyn Monroe. Vincent VanGogh. Sigmund Freud. Spalding Grey. Frida Kahlo. Shakir Stewart (Def Jam). Cleopatra. Junior Seau. Roy Raymond (founder, Victoria's Secret). Socrates. Sylvia Plath. Hunter S. Thompson. L'Wren Scott. Virginia Woolf. Abbie Hoffman. David Carradine. Wendy O. Williams. Mary Kay Bergman (SouthPark voices) Robert Enke (soccer).

These are the suicides you hear about in the media. Because of their accomplishments and talent, their suicides supercede the hushed rule in newsrooms throughout...
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Alcoholism

Take off your watch. It’s making you depressed.

I don't wear a watch. I have watches, very nice watches, in fact. I don't even know where they are - probably in a drawer somewhere.

I don't wear a watch because I have a thing with time. I learned early on in my recovery from alcoholism and depression that "time" was a problem for me. A very big problem.

I didn't realize my "time" problem until a friend in recovery asked me one day, "What time is it?" I looked at my watch and told him the time. Then he asked again, "what time is it?" And I looked at my watch again and told him the time.

"No," he said. "What TIME is it?"

I looked at him like he was crazy and said, "I don't know. You tell me, what time is it?"

"Now," he said. I had a D'oh Homer Simpson moment and then understood what he was trying to tell me. I was not in the present. "That's why I don't wear a watch," he said.
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