Archives for April, 2010

Stress Management or Avoidance?

When do coping techniques turn into avoidance?

Recently we had a minor crisis in our home.  It was actually one with a positive outcome, but regardless of the ultimate result it was unexpected and overwhelming.  Without even thinking, I began a new book.  I love to read.  I’ve devoured books since I was a child and still feel at loose ends if I don’t have a book going.  It’s a natural coping mechanism for me:  A blissful escape from problems and stress.

Soon I began reading at every possible moment.  The laundry began to pile up and the kids rejoiced at pizza and fast food dinners.  I read during dinner, in the evenings, while cooking or emptying the dishwasher.  When I wasn’t able to read, I was thinking about how I’d sneak in the next few pages.  I was avoiding the original crisis, the people around me and every tedious task I could.
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Dialectical Behavior Therapy Emotion Regulation Skills: Letting Go of Painful Emotions

It’s normal to try to avoid emotions like anger, sadness, depression, fear and shame.  These feelings are incredibly painful to experience.  In order to keep them at a distance, people create walls inside of themselves.  Unfortunately, these internal walls keep the emotion at a distance, but they also keeps the emotion trapped inside of you.  The only way truly to let go of these emotions is to stop walling them off and bring your attention to them in order to observe and describe them.

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Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Skills Groups: An Overview

We’ve all found ourselves in a crisis, in a conflict with someone important in our lives or overwhelmed by emotion and circumstances. It can be difficult to maintain emotional balance while figuring out just how to navigate through those stressful times. For some, repetitive stressful events and an inability to recover fully from one event before another occurs results in destructive behaviors, such as self-injury and suicide attempts. It takes skills to solve life’s problems while enduring intense emotion.

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Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Dialectical Dilemmas and BPD

The lives of people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) can appear contradictory and chaotic. They are frequently highly emotional and have difficulty regulating the expression of their emotions, which leads them to feel out-of-control. However, they often don’t trust their emotional responses and have high, unattainable expectations for themselves. At one moment, they may be desperate for help and want to give up, while at others they are seemingly skilled and capable. Often, people with BPD experience constant stress with immediate and extreme emotional reactions, but they hold back the expression of grief and sadness.

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Finding the Dialectic in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectics, in Dialectical Behavior Therapy, refers to the process of investigating and synthesizing apparently opposing or contradictory ideas. In DBT, there might be your truth and my truth, but there is no search for absolute truth. Instead, there is a dialog about our contradictory positions in which both can find a new meaning. It is not a search for resolution by establishing right and wrong, but a development of understanding, over time, that may never result in a final truth or indisputable fact.

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