Archives for Personality

Introversion

Self Esteem and a Quiet Ego


How does self esteem impact our lives and creativity? How do traits like egocentrism and narcissism relate to self esteem?

In his post here on PsychCentral, Steve Bressert, Ph.D. explains that Narcissistic Personality Disorder is "characterized by a long-standing pattern of grandiosity (either in fantasy or actual behavior), an overwhelming need for admiration, and usually a complete lack of empathy toward others.
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Creative Thinking

Psychological Androgyny and Creative People


"A writer should be woman-manly or man-womanly..." Virgina Woolf

Creativity researcher Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi explains that psychological androgyny refers to "a person’s ability to be at the same time aggressive and nurturant, sensitive and rigid, dominant and submissive, regardless of gender.

"A psychologically androgynous person in effect doubles his or her repertoire of responses and can interact with the world in terms of a much richer and varied spectrum of opportunities.

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Creative Thinking

Does Being Neurotic Help Us Be More Creative?


Woody Allen admits he has “a lot of neurotic habits. I don’t like to go into elevators, I don’t go through tunnels, I like the drain in the shower to be in the corner and not in the middle.”

With so much psychology related material in the news and culture, we may be especially concerned with whether our behavior is a disorder, or normal - whatever that is - and if our eccentricities can help us be more creative somehow.

What about all those "crazy" artists in history?

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Personality

The Highly Sensitive Creative Person


Are creative people more likely to be highly sensitive?

Writer Carolyn Gregoire in an article on the topic thinks one reason highly sensitive people may be so creative is an unusual depth of feeling - part of the personality trait of high sensitivity that psychologists and many creative people find supports creative exploration and expression.

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Creative Thinking

Be Normal or Be Creative

“I don’t know what ‘normal’ means, anyway.”
How does being unusual or eccentric in our viewpoints, thinking, personal style and other choices help us be more creative and innovative?

Karl Lagerfeld, the prominent fashion designer, photographer, publisher, and artistic director of Chanel, has very eclectic and unusual tastes in clothing – so I would consider him one example of an eccentric creator.

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Identity

Barbara Sher: Having Many Interests Is Not a Disorder


Do you have a wide range of passionate interests, even "too many"? Maybe you have never "settled down" into a well-defined career. Maybe you think you have ADHD - and maybe you do, but you may really be what Barbara Sher refers to as a Scanner.

In her video below, she notes it may not be the best term, and there are others such as “Polymath,” “Renaissance Soul,” or pejorative ones like “Dilettante.”

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Intuition

Joss Stone – Artist and Empath


Psychologist Elaine Aron, PhD is perhaps the leading expert on high sensitivity, or more technically, sensory processing sensitivity.

She explains that the trait includes a higher level of empathy:

“Highly sensitive individuals are those born with a tendency to notice more in their environment and deeply reflect on everything before acting, as compared to those who notice less and act quickly and impulsively. As a result, sensitive people, both children and adults, tend to be empathic, smart, intuitive, creative, careful, and conscientious…”

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