Personal Growth Articles

Photography: Art and Healing

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

A Story of a Girl and a HorsePhotographic images can be a powerful form of expression for creative people, and also a tool for therapists and anyone to help explore our inner selves.

This image by artist Jennifer Moon is titled “A Story of a Girl and a Horse: The Search for Courage.”

A news article about an installation of her photographs, sculpture and text-based works at UCLA Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A. 2014″ biennial, describes the piece as a “self-portrait, a chromogenic digital photo [that] depicts Moon on a chocolate brown horse, leaping over a bed of clouds shot through with electricity, as if she were riding a flying Unicorn.”


Creative People, Trauma, Addiction: Colin Farrell

Monday, February 17th, 2014

“Basically, I’d been fairly drunk or high since I was 14.” Colin Farrell

Colin FarrellWhy do so many creative people use and abuse drugs, often to the point of addiction?

There is of course no easy answer, but one of the factors for many people may be childhood trauma.

In his article Emotional Trauma: An Often Overlooked Root of Addiction, David Sack, M.D. writes, “A history of childhood neglect or sexual, physical or emotional abuse is common among people undergoing treatment for alcoholism and may be a factor in the development of alcohol use disorders…

“Trauma has been associated not only with drug addiction but also overeating, compulsive sexual behavior and other types of addictions.”

Another article notes, “Children who have a history of abuse, neglect, or trauma may exhibit oppositional behavior as a response to their experiences. Experiencing any kind of traumatic event increases a child’s likelihood of acting out, as they must cope with challenging feelings, thoughts, and memories.”


Creative Expression and Sexual Abuse

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Artemisia Gentileschi self portraitSo many people experience unwanted sexual contact, rape and other forms of sexual abuse.

And they often help deal with the aftermath through creative expression, perhaps using art therapy, but more often some other form of creative self-expression.

One of many articles on the topic here on Psych Central, Mental Disorders Often Follow Sexual Abuse by Rick Nauert PhD, reports: “Researchers have discovered that a history of sexual abuse is frequently linked with a lifetime diagnosis of multiple psychiatric disorders…this association held true regardless of the victim’s gender or age when the abuse occurred.”

There are many references and articles on “healing” from sexual abuse and other kinds of trauma, but it is important to keep in mind the emotional and spiritual impacts may endure, at least to some degree; dealing with abuse is not like healing a broken bone.

But experiencing abuse of any kind also does not make us “damaged goods” – see actor Teri Hatcher’s comments below.

The painting is a self portrait by Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653). An article notes she was raped by an art tutor of hers, followed by a “highly publicised seven-month trial. This event makes up the central theme of a controversial French film, Artemisia (1998), directed by Agnes Merlet.


Self Care and Being Creative Part 2

Friday, January 10th, 2014

[Continued from Part 1]

Henry RollinsMusician Henry Rollins commented about being a performer and staying healthy on road tours:

“Eating well is becoming easier on the road as more places are health conscious. Gyms are easy to find anywhere there’s electricity and traffic.

“Time is the hard part. I do my best and I learned a long time ago that without recuperative sleep, good nutrition and constant exercise, this high stress lifestyle of traveling, etc. quickly takes a toll. I just see it as a very important thing and make sure I get it done.”

From my article Taking Care of Your Creative Self.


Being Creative: Fear Is Not A Disease

Friday, December 27th, 2013

Ben Stiller in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty“Life is about courage and going into the unknown.” Cheryl (Kristen Wiig) in “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.”

The movie is a celebration of the wonderful diversity of people and places on Earth, and pursuing ideas with courage, even if most of the pursuit by Mitty is in his imagination.

It is based on a story by James Thurber (by the way, he hated the 1947 movie version, according to Turner Classic Movies), who said:

“Let us not look back in anger or forward in fear, but around in awareness.”

Ben Stiller stars in and directs this version, which a writer summarizes as being about “an ordinary man with an extraordinarily active imagination” who embarks “on a globe-trotting adventure that ultimately trumps anything in his daydreams.”


How To Create More Confidently – Part 2

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Margaret Bourke-WhiteIn Part 1 of this article Eric Maisel talks about moving from an everyday mindset of “getting things right” to a creative mindset “where huge mistakes and messes are permitted and even welcomed.”

But many of us tend to be perfectionistic – which can help drive excellence, but may also support anxiety and creative constriction.

Psychologist Stephen A. Diamond notes “Were it not for perfectionism, we would be in short supply of all those myriad human activities we deem extraordinary, excellent, outstanding or great in quality.”

But in his Psych Central article “Perfectionism: Adaptation or Pathology?”, Pavel G. Somov, Ph.D. notes, “Somewhere on a continuum between normality and pathology there is a point at which the behavior results in functional impairment.” Read more in my post Too Much Perfectionism.

Coach and author Barbara Sher has a helpful perspective on this.


How To Create More Confidently

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Art & Fear bookCreating may often include anxiety and other sorts of fear. We need to develop courage and learn how to deal with these feelings to be more fully creative.

“Art work is ordinary work, but it takes courage to embrace that work.”

That is a quote from the book “Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking,” by two artists: David Bayles and Ted Orland. They also point out, “Artists become veteran artists only by making peace not just with themselves, but with a huge range of issues.”

Actor and teacher Jeffrey Tambor describes how fear can impact presence and creativity in performances and auditions, and how to shift the experience of fear.

He notes, “We are all fear-based creatures. And fear can be the great killer. It kills your original impulses, your creativity, and it kills desire. Rather than deny fear, we have to find new ways of dealing with it. We actually have to dance with it, so to speak.”


Abandoning Your Creative Fulfillment – Part 2

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

[Continued from Part 1]

Kurt Vonnegut“The practice of any art isn’t to make a living, it’s to make your soul grow.”

Kurt Vonnegut

To be creative at times feels like an almost effortless flow, but creative work may also require a high level of courage and boldness – even to make the choice to do something creative.


Abandoning Your Creative Fulfillment

Sunday, November 10th, 2013

“Art is never finished, only abandoned.”

"paint by numbers!" - By originallittlehellraiserThat quote (attributed to both Leonardo da Vinci and Picasso) is most likely about the process of creating a piece of work – but what about abandoning even the attempt to create something: a painting, novel, smart phone app, new business, or anything substantial?

What if your talents and intelligence have gained success for you in an area that is not particularly creative, but still, deep down, you have a passion to create?

Did you enjoy creating early in life? What stops us from continuing that pleasure? There are, of course, a number of reasons.

In her book The Gifted Adult, Mary-Elaine Jacobsen, PsyD, for example, writes about an experience in fifth grade when her teacher “shredded” a poem she had written:

“She insisted I had copied it from a book, humiliating me in front of the class by bellowing, ‘No one your age could have written such a thing. Shame on you.’ I learned that expressing myself was a dangerous thing to do. Becoming a person of few words was difficult for an enthusiastic extrovert such as myself.”


Be More Creative: Keep the Channel Open

Friday, May 10th, 2013

Martha-Graham-Think-different“Well, obviously you need a writing instrument and you need an idea. I’m just not sure which should come first.”

Forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance ‘Bones’ Brennan (Emily Deschanel), from TV Series “Bones” (imdb.com)

Creative expression is not just about using outside materials and tools, but actually being an instrument oneself.

It is a valuable and challenging idea that has been a theme of a number of acting coaches, but also applies to any form of creative work.

One example was the acclaimed teacher Sanford Meisner who said, “Every actor’s instrument is different because every actors instrument is their humanity, their sensitivity. Their soul. And there is no ‘right way’ or ‘one way’ to get to that instrument. That soul.”

[Book: Sanford Meisner on Acting.]

The following inspiring and insightful perspectives by dancer, choreographer and teacher Martha Graham have been around many years, and widely quoted – but it may be valuable to think about them every now and then.


 

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