Archives for Personal Growth

Consciousness

Drumming and Brainwaves and Creativity


There are many personal reports and research studies on how meditation can help people be more creative.

For example, In his post 5 Keys To Freeing Up Creativity From David Lynch, David Silverman comments that multitalented artist and movie director David Lynch has "talked about freeing up his subconscious to write screenplays using TM [Transcendental Meditation].

"He believes the process helps him catch ideas on a deeper level. He feels meditation expands his consciousness, giving him access to more and deeper information, which make hunting ideas more exciting."

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Identity

Using Your Creative Voice

Do you express yourself creatively - or in other ways - as fully and authentically as you want? If you're like most of us, the answer is No. For one thing, our inner dialogue can be less than helpful or encouraging.

Author Pearl Cleage points out some of the ways our inner critic may dampen our creative voice:

"I think one of the things that writers and creative artists generally have to deal with is the censors that we have in our heads, the voices that we have that say you better not tell that and don't tell that, and people will think you're not a good girl, and your grandmother's going to be mad at you and all of those things." [via brainyquote.com]

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Identity

Are All Creative People Insecure?


Even people with exceptional creative talents and accomplishments can feel insecure.

Meryl Streep, for example, has said, “I have varying degrees of confidence and self-loathing…You can have a perfectly horrible day where you doubt your talent… Or that you’re boring and they’re going to find out that you don’t know what you’re doing.”

Over the years of reading biographies and doing interviews with many highly talented and creative people, it has often struck me how many of them talk about being self-critical, and feel insecure at times.

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Consciousness

Trusting Your Instincts to Be Creative


Being creative, realizing our talents and crafting a fulfilling life involve self-awareness and respecting who we really are, including our unconscious depths. Many artists, psychologists and others refer to access to our creative inner depths as instinct or intuition.

Actor Jodie Foster describes what many artists want in their work:

“You look for films that hit you in the gut, in this unconscious place that really moves you, then you can’t help but make the movie because it’s something that you fear and you want to know more about it.”

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Consciousness

Michael Gelb on How To Be More Creative


In his writings and presentations about being creative, Michael Gelb addresses many topics, including being sensitive and creative:

"Every sound and every silence provides an opportunity to deepen auditory attunement; but city sounds can be overwhelming and cause us to dull our sensitivity.

"Surrounded by noises from televisions, airplanes, subways and automobiles, most of us 'tune out' for self-protection."

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Consciousness

Todd Kashdan on Our Dark Side and Creativity


"When we are happy, we are very superficial in our thinking."

A clinical psychologist, professor and well-being researcher, Todd Kashdan addresses how happiness and "unwanted" emotions affect creative thinking and overall well-being in his book "The Upside of Your Dark Side" - an admittedly 'provocative' title that may bring to mind Darth Vader.

What some may label "negative" emotions and ideas are what psychologist Carl Jung and others identify as part of the Shadow Self, which may in varying degrees be shut away from our awareness by active suppression or repression and just not paying attention.

But as artists and others realize, our inner depths - this wealth of emotional and imaginational material - can provide material for creative expression.

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Creative Thinking

Fairy Tales and Bigger Truths


“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” ― Albert Einstein

Stories, perhaps especially the more elaborate and potent examples of fantasy and fairytale, can do more than entertain: they can reveal how others, and ourselves, manage being human. And how we can do better at it.

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