Neuroscience Articles

Chaos and Creative Expression

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

Dylan Thomas-word-network“The very impulse to write, I think, springs from an inner chaos crying for order, for meaning, and that meaning must be discovered in the process of writing or the work lies dead as it is finished.” Arthur Miller

Creative people and writers about the creative process often say creative work is a way to release or make use of inner chaos; what is this turmoil?

Psychologist Stephen Diamond declares in his book that our impulse to be creative “can be understood to some degree as the subjective struggle to give form, structure and constructive expression to inner and outer chaos and conflict.”


Idleness and Being Creative

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Between the Trees by Ellie Davies

“I don’t think necessity is the mother of invention. Invention, in my opinion, arises directly from idleness, possibly also from laziness – to save oneself trouble.”
Agatha Christie [via brainyquote.com]

We may feel pressured to stay busy and keep producing, but is there some value for developing creativity in being, if not lazy, at least idle for a time?


Can People With ADHD Be More Creative?

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

A number of psychologists note that many personality traits connected with ADD and ADHD are also associated with highly creative people.

Lisa Ling - brain-graphicThis is a topic I have addressed in previous Creative Mind posts, but here are some new perspectives, inspired by a documentary by Lisa Ling who was diagnosed with ADD during the course of her research for the project.

She commented, “As a journalist, when I’m immersed in a story, then I feel like I can laser-focus. But if I’m not working, my mind goes in every direction but where it’s supposed to go. I’ve been like that since I was a kid.”


Are Brains of Artists Different?

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

With more and more brain imaging studies in the media, relating to different areas of human behavior including being creative, it is worth noting there are critiques of the validity and meaning of imaging technology.

brain scan-Human Connectome ProjectThe image is from an article whose authors comment, “The brain is said to be the final scientific frontier, and rightly so in our view.

“Yet, in many quarters, brain-based explanations appear to be granted a kind of inherent superiority over all other ways of accounting for human behaviour.

“We call this assumption ‘neurocentrism’ – the view that human experience and behaviour can be best explained from the predominant or even exclusive perspective of the brain.”


Asperger’s and Creativity Part 3

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

[Continued from Asperger's and Creativity Part 2]

Quirks and creativity

Scott Barry KaufmanScott Barry Kaufman, a cognitive psychologist at NYU interested in intelligence and creativity development, commented in a post of his:

“I think a lot of things that we call ‘quirks’, or maybe even some things we call ‘disabilities’, can turn out to be some of the determinants of high levels of creativity that we never could plan ahead of time.”

From Conversations on Creativity with Darold Treffert, Part I: Defining Autism, Savantism, and Genius.

[Photo from his video "Creativity" - see a clip in my post Don’t You Have To Be “Gifted and Talented” To Be Creative?]

In his book Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined, Kaufman writes about many aspects of the syndrome, and notes that people with Asperger’s tend to do “exceptionally well on perceptual tests of fluid reasoning, such as the Raven’s progressive matrices test.”


Asperger’s and Creativity Part 2

Monday, August 5th, 2013

[Continued from Asperger's and Creativity Part 1]

ThomasHorn-Extremely LoudA number of movies and TV shows have characters who show characteristics associated with autism – with varying degrees of accuracy, according to critics – including “Touch,” “Parenthood,” physicist Sheldon Cooper on “The Big Bang Theory” and forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan on “Bones.”

The photo is actor Thomas Horn in the powerful movie “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” as Oskar, a “nine-year-old amateur inventor, Francophile, and pacifist who searches New York City for the lock that matches a mysterious key left behind by his father, who died in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001″ [imdb.com].

The photo is from the article “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Familiar” by Beth Arky, (Child Mind Institute), who noted “Autism advocates embrace the movie, and slam critics who disparage the hero.”


Asperger’s and Creativity

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Mary-and-JerryNewportCan Asperger’s Syndrome or related conditions include neurological differences and qualities that enhance creativity?

A page on the Asperger’s Association of New England site – What is Asperger Syndrome? – declares “There is strong evidence that such superstars as Vincent Van Gogh, Emily Dickinson, Albert Einstein, code-breaker Alan Turing, and musician Glen Gould, among many others, all had Asperger Syndrome. Today, too, there are adults with AS who are successful as professors, lawyers, physicians, artists, authors, and educators.”

The Asperger’s Syndrome page on webmd.com says “Many children with Asperger’s syndrome are exceptionally talented or skilled in a particular area, such as music or math.”


The Dyslexic and Creative Mind – Part 3

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

[Conclusion - also see Part 1 and Part 2]

Ascending-and-Descending [detail]Neuroscience research

In his book: “Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined,” cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman refers to a study by Catya von Karolyi, Ellen Winner, Wendy Gray, and Gordon Sherman: “Dyslexia linked to talent: Global visual-spatial ability” in the journal Brain and Language.

The researchers “argue that dyslexic individuals may excel at visual-spatial tasks that rely on the right hemisphere, because the right hemisphere tends to process information holistically.”

They evaluated people viewing “impossible figures”: objects that “seem to be 3-D but could not actually exist in 3-D space. Examples can be found in M. C. Escher’s paintings, such as his famous impossible staircase painting, Ascending and Descending.


The Dyslexic and Creative Mind

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Richard Ford had dyslexia“There were a lot of benefits to being dyslexic for me…I think I came into an appreciation of all those qualities of language…” Novelist Richard Ford

Although traditionally classified as a learning disability, dyslexia can also lead to advantages in thinking and behaving that enhance creativity.

Dyslexia is defined by one authority as “a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities.” [The International Dyslexia Association.]

Richard Ford has explained how it was a benefit to his creativity as a writer: “When I finally did reconcile myself to how slow I was going to have to do it, then I think I came into an appreciation of all those qualities of language and of sentences that are not just the cognitive aspects.


Scott Barry Kaufman On Shifting Awareness To Be More Creative

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

His Scientific American blog Beautiful Minds notes Scott Barry Kaufman, PhD is “adjunct assistant professor of psychology at New York University, where he teaches courses on cognitive psychology and human intelligence” and is a co-founder of The Creativity Post.

In a post for that site, he writes that his new book “Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined” includes “my personal and scientific exploration of a broad range of research on the development of IQ, expertise, talent, and creativity.

“My investigation spans genetics and neuroscience, as well as evolutionary, developmental, social, positive, and cognitive psychology.”

In this video – “Use It or Lose It Expert: Scott Barry Kaufman” (for National Geographic) – he talks about how developing creative thinking involves moving back and forth from broad fields of attention, to more narrow ones.


 

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