Mental Health Articles

Can People With ADHD Be More Creative?

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

A number of psychologists note that many personality traits connected with ADD and ADHD are also associated with highly creative people.

Lisa Ling - brain-graphicThis is a topic I have addressed in previous Creative Mind posts, but here are some new perspectives, inspired by a documentary by Lisa Ling who was diagnosed with ADD during the course of her research for the project.

She commented, “As a journalist, when I’m immersed in a story, then I feel like I can laser-focus. But if I’m not working, my mind goes in every direction but where it’s supposed to go. I’ve been like that since I was a kid.”


Patrick Stewart, Trauma and Creative Work

Monday, May 26th, 2014

Most of us experience some kind of trauma in life.

Patrick StewartHow does it impact creative people, and how can creative expression help?

Acclaimed actor Patrick Stewart is one of many artists who have been deeply impacted by trauma in early life.

An interview article notes he “was for decades a man plagued by fear and stifled by rage. The roots of his struggle go back to a difficult childhood, marked by poverty and abuse that took him years to understand.”


Do Impostor Feelings Dampen Your Creativity?

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

Even very talented people may experience fraud or impostor feelings, which can lead to insecurity about their abilities, despite their accomplishments.

Jodie Foster holding her Sherry Lansing Leadership Award“I always feel like something of an impostor. I don’t know what I’m doing.”

Jodie Foster made that comment in her acceptance speech as recipient of the Sherry Lansing Leadership Award several years ago.

A highly accomplished actor, director and producer, Foster also said, “I suppose that’s my one little secret, the secret of my success.”

From my article: Jodie Foster on impostor feelings and faking it.


Painter Robert Genn on Art and Happiness

Sunday, February 23rd, 2014

Robert GennIn an issue of his newsletter, artist Robert Genn notes that in his book “Against Happiness” writer Eric Wilson “disparages our current love affair with putting on a happy face.”

Wilson thinks that with our “feel good” culture and the “widespread use of happy drugs, everybody’s trying to be cheerful and there are no decent dollops of melancholy and sadness. When this happens, art becomes bland, unchallenging and redundant.”

Genn notes, “Dr. Thomas Svolos of the department of Psychiatry at Creighton University School of Medicine thinks Wilson is right. ‘When you’re melancholy, you tend to step back and examine your life,’ he says. ‘That kind of questioning is essential for creativity.’


Creative People, Trauma, Addiction: Colin Farrell

Monday, February 17th, 2014

“Basically, I’d been fairly drunk or high since I was 14.” Colin Farrell

Colin FarrellWhy do so many creative people use and abuse drugs, often to the point of addiction?

There is of course no easy answer, but one of the factors for many people may be childhood trauma.

In his article Emotional Trauma: An Often Overlooked Root of Addiction, David Sack, M.D. writes, “A history of childhood neglect or sexual, physical or emotional abuse is common among people undergoing treatment for alcoholism and may be a factor in the development of alcohol use disorders…

“Trauma has been associated not only with drug addiction but also overeating, compulsive sexual behavior and other types of addictions.”

Another article notes, “Children who have a history of abuse, neglect, or trauma may exhibit oppositional behavior as a response to their experiences. Experiencing any kind of traumatic event increases a child’s likelihood of acting out, as they must cope with challenging feelings, thoughts, and memories.”


Sensitivity and Creativity: Cheryl Richardson and Alanis Morissette

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

Self-Care for the Creative Soul“The more you become your own best champion, supporter, cheerleader, and trusted confidant, the better able you’ll be to fully and joyfully express your blessed creativity.

“That’s when your art becomes more and more successful in the world. It begins with treating yourself with love, respect, kindness, and compassion.”

Those quotes by coach and author Cheryl Richardson relate to her extensive writing and teaching on self-care for creative and highly sensitive people.

She is presenting “Self-Care for the Creative Soul” with Alanis Morissette – a retreat March 2-6, 2014, at Miraval Resort in Tucson, Arizona.


Creative Expression and Sexual Abuse

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Artemisia Gentileschi self portraitSo many people experience unwanted sexual contact, rape and other forms of sexual abuse.

And they often help deal with the aftermath through creative expression, perhaps using art therapy, but more often some other form of creative self-expression.

One of many articles on the topic here on Psych Central, Mental Disorders Often Follow Sexual Abuse by Rick Nauert PhD, reports: “Researchers have discovered that a history of sexual abuse is frequently linked with a lifetime diagnosis of multiple psychiatric disorders…this association held true regardless of the victim’s gender or age when the abuse occurred.”

There are many references and articles on “healing” from sexual abuse and other kinds of trauma, but it is important to keep in mind the emotional and spiritual impacts may endure, at least to some degree; dealing with abuse is not like healing a broken bone.

But experiencing abuse of any kind also does not make us “damaged goods” – see actor Teri Hatcher’s comments below.

The painting is a self portrait by Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653). An article notes she was raped by an art tutor of hers, followed by a “highly publicised seven-month trial. This event makes up the central theme of a controversial French film, Artemisia (1998), directed by Agnes Merlet.


Self Care and Being Creative Part 2

Friday, January 10th, 2014

[Continued from Part 1]

Henry RollinsMusician Henry Rollins commented about being a performer and staying healthy on road tours:

“Eating well is becoming easier on the road as more places are health conscious. Gyms are easy to find anywhere there’s electricity and traffic.

“Time is the hard part. I do my best and I learned a long time ago that without recuperative sleep, good nutrition and constant exercise, this high stress lifestyle of traveling, etc. quickly takes a toll. I just see it as a very important thing and make sure I get it done.”

From my article Taking Care of Your Creative Self.


How To Create More Confidently

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Art & Fear bookCreating may often include anxiety and other sorts of fear. We need to develop courage and learn how to deal with these feelings to be more fully creative.

“Art work is ordinary work, but it takes courage to embrace that work.”

That is a quote from the book “Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking,” by two artists: David Bayles and Ted Orland. They also point out, “Artists become veteran artists only by making peace not just with themselves, but with a huge range of issues.”

Actor and teacher Jeffrey Tambor describes how fear can impact presence and creativity in performances and auditions, and how to shift the experience of fear.

He notes, “We are all fear-based creatures. And fear can be the great killer. It kills your original impulses, your creativity, and it kills desire. Rather than deny fear, we have to find new ways of dealing with it. We actually have to dance with it, so to speak.”


Do We Need to be Crazy to be Creative?

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

“Creativity is a divine madness… a gift from the gods.” Plato

musician Sting“People who are getting into this archetype of the tortured poet end up really torturing themselves to death.” Sting

This mythology of madness as a fuel for creativity, or an inherent part of creative minds, continues to affect how we think of artists – and ourselves as creative people.

For example, psychiatrist and creativity author Albert Rothenberg MD commented that “Deviant behavior, whether in the form of eccentricity or worse, is not only associated with persons of genius or high-level creativity, but it is frequently expected of them.”

That is one of the dangers of this mythology: that we may consider ourselves “not crazy enough” to be creative, or that our mental health challenges such as anxiety and depression should be endured, in order to “protect” our creative power.


 

Subscribe to this Blog: Feed

Recent Comments
  • InTheMoment: You might check out ADHD/BiPolar as more likely culprits than trauma in leading so many of theses...
  • vic marlow: Of course, they make sure to make the suggestion that latent inhibition can’t help anyone with low...
  • Chase Jackson: Journaling and mind-mapping work absolute wonders for me in developing my creative ideas. Great Work!
  • Andri Monoyiou: Yes, been there… So are we artists or just depressed people trying to heal? What if only art...
  • James Williamson: A fascinating insight into high sensitivity.
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 12240
Join Us Now!