Life circumstances Articles

Pushed to Excel – Part 2

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Lang Lang[Continued from Part 1]
What does creative excellence take?

In his article How to Win American Idol, psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman refers to research by Rena Subotnik and Linda Jarvin, who “interviewed over 80 top students at different stages of their musical careers and identified the traits important to succeed at every stage on the way to the top.

“The three abilities that were absolutely necessary as a baseline were intrinsic motivation, charisma, and musicality.”

But for musicians at an “elite” level of talent, “technical proficiency mattered less and the following factors rose to prominence: self-promotion skills, having a good agent, capitalizing on strengths, overcoming self-doubt, exuding self-confidence, good social skills, persevering through criticisms and defeats, and taking risks.”

How does a brutal teaching style impact those factors?


Pushed to Excel

Friday, October 17th, 2014

“I push people beyond what’s expected of them. I believe that is an absolute necessity.”

Whiplash-movieHow much does forceful mentoring help students achieve excellence, and when does it become abusive?

Those issues are part of the movie Whiplash, apparently named after the jazz standard by Hank Levy.

The quote above is by acclaimed teacher Terence Fletcher (JK Simmons) at a music school reputed to be “one of the best in the country,” explaining his teaching approach to one of his star pupils, Andrew (Miles Teller), who idolizes jazz drummer Buddy Rich, and has aspirations to also be “one of the greats.”


Multitalented: So Many Choices

Sunday, October 5th, 2014

college-majorsOne of the myths of creative and multitalented people may be that they can choose whatever personal and career paths they want.

Having many interests and abilities can make for a rich and satisfying life, but also be a source of stress, especially at crossroads like choosing college majors.

Gifted education specialist Tamara Fisher quotes Bryant (a pseudonym), a graduating senior who lists his possible future careers as “applied psychologist, scientific psychologist, college teacher, philosophy, mathematics, architect, engineer.”


Being Happy As An Artist

Friday, September 5th, 2014

“I’ve suffered enough. When does my artwork improve?” Refrigerator magnet

StingThe tortured artist mythology is an ancient and enduring one: The idea that art depends on suffering, and artists need to be suffering with dark emotions, and need their pain to create.

But that is a wrong and destructive idea.

For example, in his appearance as a guest on The Ellen Show, Colin Farrell said he is more creative being sober and happy.

“I ascribed to the notion that to express yourself as an artist, you have to live in perpetual pain. And that’s nonsense.”

Musician Sting also said he bought into this myth for a long time:


Robin Williams: Intensity Is Not Pathology – Part 2

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

[Continued from Part 1]

Robin WilliamsAs Dr. Webb explains “Existential depression is a depression that arises when an individual confronts certain basic issues of existence… (or ‘ultimate concerns’) – death, freedom, isolation and meaninglessness.”

[Gifted, Sensitive, In Need Of Meaning: Existential Depression.]

His related book: Searching for Meaning: Idealism, Bright Minds, Disillusionment, and Hope.

Webb has written extensively about how characteristics of giftedness that are a part of so many people – including well-known artists such as Robin Williams – are often misdiagnosed.


Feeling Pressured To Create

Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Chuck CloseOne kind of pressure is feeling an intense urge to create; it is probably an inherent part of being a creative person.

But other pressures can lead to stress and overwhelm, and being pulled away from the joys of creating.

Annemarie Roeper (founder of the Roeper School and The Roeper Review, a professional journal on the gifted) wrote about this intense inner pressure to create as a characteristic of high ability people – but you may experience this even if you are not “technically” gifted:

“Gifted adults may be overwhelmed by the pressure of their own creativity. The gifted derive enormous satisfaction from the creative process.


Patrick Stewart, Trauma and Creative Work

Monday, May 26th, 2014

Most of us experience some kind of trauma in life.

Patrick StewartHow does it impact creative people, and how can creative expression help?

Acclaimed actor Patrick Stewart is one of many artists who have been deeply impacted by trauma in early life.

An interview article notes he “was for decades a man plagued by fear and stifled by rage. The roots of his struggle go back to a difficult childhood, marked by poverty and abuse that took him years to understand.”


Creative People, Trauma, Addiction: Colin Farrell

Monday, February 17th, 2014

“Basically, I’d been fairly drunk or high since I was 14.” Colin Farrell

Colin FarrellWhy do so many creative people use and abuse drugs, often to the point of addiction?

There is of course no easy answer, but one of the factors for many people may be childhood trauma.

In his article Emotional Trauma: An Often Overlooked Root of Addiction, David Sack, M.D. writes, “A history of childhood neglect or sexual, physical or emotional abuse is common among people undergoing treatment for alcoholism and may be a factor in the development of alcohol use disorders…

“Trauma has been associated not only with drug addiction but also overeating, compulsive sexual behavior and other types of addictions.”

Another article notes, “Children who have a history of abuse, neglect, or trauma may exhibit oppositional behavior as a response to their experiences. Experiencing any kind of traumatic event increases a child’s likelihood of acting out, as they must cope with challenging feelings, thoughts, and memories.”


Creative Expression and Sexual Abuse

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Artemisia Gentileschi self portraitSo many people experience unwanted sexual contact, rape and other forms of sexual abuse.

And they often help deal with the aftermath through creative expression, perhaps using art therapy, but more often some other form of creative self-expression.

One of many articles on the topic here on Psych Central, Mental Disorders Often Follow Sexual Abuse by Rick Nauert PhD, reports: “Researchers have discovered that a history of sexual abuse is frequently linked with a lifetime diagnosis of multiple psychiatric disorders…this association held true regardless of the victim’s gender or age when the abuse occurred.”

There are many references and articles on “healing” from sexual abuse and other kinds of trauma, but it is important to keep in mind the emotional and spiritual impacts may endure, at least to some degree; dealing with abuse is not like healing a broken bone.

But experiencing abuse of any kind also does not make us “damaged goods” – see actor Teri Hatcher’s comments below.

The painting is a self portrait by Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653). An article notes she was raped by an art tutor of hers, followed by a “highly publicised seven-month trial. This event makes up the central theme of a controversial French film, Artemisia (1998), directed by Agnes Merlet.


Calling Yourself an Artist

Sunday, January 19th, 2014

Michelle CorneliusHow important is it to identify yourself as an artist – to others, and especially to yourself?

What if you don’t get awards for your creative work? What if it isn’t even seen by others?

Are you still an artist if you are doing something else for survival?

Psychologist Robert Maurer has worked with many creative people and researches the dynamics of success. He comments:

“The people who love their craft and see themselves as artists, and carry that identity through and study each day… are the people who thrive. To me, that’s the only definition of success that matters.”


 

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