Archives for Life circumstances

Consciousness

Emotional Intelligence To Be Creative – Part 3

What emotions and thinking may hold us back from being more creative? The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence article "Creativity, Emotions and the Arts" quoted in Part 2 talks about students holding back from being creative out of concerns "that people might think original ideas are silly" - but this kind of retreating from creative work can apply to us at any age. An example might be Joss Whedon - one of my favorite artists, who has credits as actor, writer, producer and director of movies and TV shows including Firefly, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, Dollhouse, The Avengers, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. etc etc.
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Developing Creativity

Emotional Intelligence To Be Creative – Part 2

Continuing her remarks for the Emotion Revolution Summit at Yale [see Part 1], Lady Gaga noted some of the approaches she has explored to deal with her anxiety and depression, and to enhance her emotional health: "I take anti-depressant medication for it. I have tried to get off of it my doctor always tells me not to, that it's not safe for me to. "Whenever I've tried to I've gotten very neurotic, manic, sick so I have had to study all different types of ways... I started looking into Ayurvedic medicine. I started looking into meditation.
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Life circumstances

Emotional Intelligence To Be Creative

“I am the kind of person that feels so much that if I didn’t have acting (and music), I would burst from all of the emotion inside!”  – Actor Gloria Reuben “I don’t like emotions… For some reason I’m more comfortable in imaginary circumstances.” – Actor William H. Macy Do you remember how much you felt and thought as a child? Probably a lot if you are creative, especially if you are gifted or highly sensitive.
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Creative Thinking

Solitude To Be Creative

Some forms of creative expression – such as acting and filmmaking – involve collaborating with other people. But a number of artists make use of isolation and do their best creative work alone. One example: George Orwell chose to write “Nineteen Eighty-Four” (from about 1946-1949) while living in Barnhill (photo), an abandoned farmhouse on the isle of Jura in the Inner Hebrides.
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Consciousness

Deal With Energy Vampires To Be More Creative

"Energy is the key to creativity. Energy is the key to life." William Shatner We need more than ideas to be creative, we need passion and energy. Being productive in most creative ventures takes ongoing motivation and resolve. Some situations and people fuel our emotional energy, and some suck it away. How can we deal with that kind of energy drain?
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Identity

Barbara Sher: Having Many Interests Is Not a Disorder

Do you have a wide range of passionate interests, even "too many"? Maybe you have never "settled down" into a well-defined career. Maybe you think you have ADHD - and maybe you do, but you may really be what Barbara Sher refers to as a Scanner. In her video below, she notes it may not be the best term, and there are others such as “Polymath,” “Renaissance Soul,” or pejorative ones like “Dilettante.”
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Consciousness

Fear and Your Writing

“It scared me sometimes when I was writing it; at times I had to stop—I frightened myself." That is an admission by novelist A.M. Homes - see more of her quotes below. If an aspect of your creative work scares or upsets you, should you change that part of the painting, or modify that design element in your performance, or stop exploring what that character is doing in your novel?
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