Inspiration Articles

Where Do You Get Creative Inspiration? – Part 2

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

[Continued from Part 1.]

brain-Human Connectome Project“Before the dance of inspiration and perspiration can begin, there must be some raw material, some spark of inciting energy.”

From the book The Soul of Creativity: Insights into the Creative Process by Tona Pearce Myers.

Actor Rose McGowan relates an experience that may be common for many creative people: being inspired by seeing someone else’s artwork or other form of creative expression:

“After saving my allowance for ten years, I flew to Paris when I was 15 years old. When I visited the Musée Rodin, I was profoundly inspired by the story and the pain of Camille Claudel. Her diminutive sculptures — much smaller in stature to Rodin’s — led me to become an artist.”


Where Do We Get Creative Inspiration?

Sunday, November 9th, 2014

Kiss of the Muse by Paul CezanneWhere does creative inspiration come from? It may show up mysteriously, “out of the blue” – and for a good part of human history, it has been explained as a gift from a supernatural being, a Muse.

At least some people still embrace that idea, or at least like to use the concept.

Novelist and author Steven Pressfield writes in his book “The War of Art” about pulling in creative power when we are doing creative work:


Fear and Courage and Creating

Friday, October 31st, 2014

Matisse quote

“The artist begins with a vision — a creative operation requiring effort. Creativity takes courage.” Henri Matisse

What fears and anxieties are holding you back from expressing yourself more creatively? Matisse and many other artists and psychologists note creative work requires courage or dealing with our fears.


Pushed to Excel – Part 2

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Lang Lang[Continued from Part 1]
What does creative excellence take?

In his article How to Win American Idol, psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman refers to research by Rena Subotnik and Linda Jarvin, who “interviewed over 80 top students at different stages of their musical careers and identified the traits important to succeed at every stage on the way to the top.

“The three abilities that were absolutely necessary as a baseline were intrinsic motivation, charisma, and musicality.”

But for musicians at an “elite” level of talent, “technical proficiency mattered less and the following factors rose to prominence: self-promotion skills, having a good agent, capitalizing on strengths, overcoming self-doubt, exuding self-confidence, good social skills, persevering through criticisms and defeats, and taking risks.”

How does a brutal teaching style impact those factors?


Pushed to Excel

Friday, October 17th, 2014

“I push people beyond what’s expected of them. I believe that is an absolute necessity.”

Whiplash-movieHow much does forceful mentoring help students achieve excellence, and when does it become abusive?

Those issues are part of the movie Whiplash, apparently named after the jazz standard by Hank Levy.

The quote above is by acclaimed teacher Terence Fletcher (JK Simmons) at a music school reputed to be “one of the best in the country,” explaining his teaching approach to one of his star pupils, Andrew (Miles Teller), who idolizes jazz drummer Buddy Rich, and has aspirations to also be “one of the greats.”


Ada Lovelace, Innovation and Imagination

Monday, October 13th, 2014

“Imagination…discovers the real.”

Ada LovelaceAugusta Ada, Countess of Lovelace, was a daughter of poet Lord Byron, and worked with polymath Charles Babbage, who called her The Enchantress of Numbers.

The computer language ADA was named after her, in recognition of her work that helped originate software and computers.

Ada Lovelace talked about her passions for creative imagination and math:

“Imagination is the Discovering Faculty, pre-eminently … It is that which feels & discovers what is, the REAL which we see not, which exists not for our senses.


Transformational Writing and Sparking Creative Flow

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

pen image from Getting Creative Juices Flowing article

Author, professor and CEO Ocean Robbins and his father John are examples of transformational writers. Ocean recalls:

“I was ten-years-old when my dad first began to write Diet for a New America. It was the first book to expose the truth about factory farms, and the link between food and our planet, to a wide audience. In the five years after the book’s publication in 1987, beef consumption in the United States dropped by 25%, and my dad received more than 50,000 letters from readers, thanking him for changing their lives.

“As we’ve seen in our family, sometimes writing can change the world.”


Idleness and Being Creative

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Between the Trees by Ellie Davies

“I don’t think necessity is the mother of invention. Invention, in my opinion, arises directly from idleness, possibly also from laziness – to save oneself trouble.”
Agatha Christie [via brainyquote.com]

We may feel pressured to stay busy and keep producing, but is there some value for developing creativity in being, if not lazy, at least idle for a time?


The Surreal Fashion Photography of Miss Aniela

Saturday, July 19th, 2014

Miss Aniela - LEGERDEMAINMost of my limited experience of fashion photography has been the occasional magazine feature or ad, and the images typically seem to me mainly designed to document the clothing.

The work of London-based fashion photographer Natalie Dybisz, who works under the name Miss Aniela, is much more complex and intriguing.

Writer Sarah Bradley describes some of how Miss Aniela works:

“Blurring the lines between art, photography, and fashion, Miss Aniela’s collection of Surreal Fashion takes us to a mysterious place where the most elaborate and fantastical dreams come to life.”


Natalie Fobes on Pursuing Creative Passion

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

Natalie Fobes - pipelineHow does our self concept, our identity, affect creative expression?

How do we find creative passions and how does pursuing them demand changes in our life?

One example of an artist who has addressed these questions is Natalie Fobes.

A bio on her site summarizes some of her personal journey and work:

“Not many photographers have faced winds of 90 knots and seas of 40 feet while on a fishing boat in the middle of the Bering Sea.

“Few can describe the bitter cold of a Siberian winter while camped out with Chukchi reindeer herders. Or say that their first client was National Geographic Magazine.


 

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  • Steve Simms: Flashes of inspiration, hunches, intuition — are some names for the Muse. I also believe that we...
  • rtee: This is a very timely message for me. Thank you for posting it. I have been accosted by fear of failure for too...
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