Archives for Innovation

Developing Creativity

Emotional Intelligence To Be Creative – Part 2

Continuing her remarks for the Emotion Revolution Summit at Yale [see Part 1], Lady Gaga noted some of the approaches she has explored to deal with her anxiety and depression, and to enhance her emotional health: "I take anti-depressant medication for it. I have tried to get off of it my doctor always tells me not to, that it's not safe for me to. "Whenever I've tried to I've gotten very neurotic, manic, sick so I have had to study all different types of ways... I started looking into Ayurvedic medicine. I started looking into meditation.
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Creative Thinking

Being Sensitive But Rocking The Boat

Being creative is not some kind of personality trait; you need to have more than just creative ideas or innovative possibilities, you need to actually do something in the world: record that song, write a book or article, put together a smart phone app. As author and entrepreneur Seth Godin says, “What you do for a living is not be creative, what you do is ship.”
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Consciousness

Michael Gelb on How To Be More Creative

In his writings and presentations about being creative, Michael Gelb addresses many topics, including being sensitive and creative: "Every sound and every silence provides an opportunity to deepen auditory attunement; but city sounds can be overwhelming and cause us to dull our sensitivity. "Surrounded by noises from televisions, airplanes, subways and automobiles, most of us 'tune out' for self-protection."
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Consciousness

Ada Lovelace, Innovation and Imagination

"Imagination...discovers the real." Augusta Ada, Countess of Lovelace, was a daughter of poet Lord Byron, and worked with polymath Charles Babbage, who called her The Enchantress of Numbers. The computer language ADA was named after her, in recognition of her work that helped originate software and computers. Ada Lovelace talked about her passions for creative imagination and math: "Imagination is the Discovering Faculty, pre-eminently ... It is that which feels & discovers what is, the REAL which we see not, which exists not for our senses.
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Creative Thinking

Idleness and Being Creative

"I don't think necessity is the mother of invention. Invention, in my opinion, arises directly from idleness, possibly also from laziness - to save oneself trouble." Agatha Christie [via brainyquote.com] We may feel pressured to stay busy and keep producing, but is there some value for developing creativity in being, if not lazy, at least idle for a time?
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Consciousness

Heidi Grant Halvorson on Creative Success

One of the themes of creativity research, and many psychologists and creativity coaches, is how crucial beliefs and attitudes are in developing our creative abilities. Psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson talks in the audio clip below about the prevalent idea of 'genius' for whether someone can be creative - or even aspire to be. She also writes about focus and creating, and that "to be a successful creative, you need to not only be a good generator, but also a good evaluator. The problem is that in practice, it’s remarkably hard to be both.
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Creative Thinking

David Burkus on Myths of Creativity

There are many ideas about being creative: You have to wait for a flash of inspiration; You need to be a "genius"; Artists are crazy (or at least flaky); You should be in pain to create, and many other myths which often get in the way of personal creative work, and business innovation. In his book "The Myths of Creativity" David Burkus, writes about one of the most enduring myths: that creative inspiration comes from an outside source or entity: "The ancient Greeks told and retold stories of gods, supernatural creatures, and regular mortals as a way to explain how they thought the world worked…They created the muses, who received and answered the prayers of ancient writers, musicians, and even engineers. "The muses were the bearers of creativity’s divine spark. They were the source of inspiration. Even thinkers as great as Plato believed that poets drew all of their creativity from the muses, so that any works by the poets were really considered works of the muses."
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