Archives for Identity

Creative Thinking

The INTJ Personality and Being Creative Part 2

[Continued from Part 1.] Psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman comments in an article about some of the problems with categorizing and typing people:

"The most common misunderstanding of the extraversion-introversion dimension is that introverts are more introspective than extroverts. In reality, introverts are not necessarily introspective and highly introspective people aren't necessarily introverted."

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Consciousness

The INTJ Personality and Being Creative

"My psyche's fight, my whole life, has been the head against the heart."
According to PersonalityPage.com, a website "about Psychological Type, created by the view from the shoulders of Carl G. Jung, and the work of Isabel Briggs Myers, creator of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)", the INTJ type is "Introverted iNtuitive Thinking Judging (Introverted Intuition with Extraverted Thinking)."

Jodie Foster is among many people on lists of the various Myers-Briggs personality types, such as the page Famous INTJs.

She has commented, "I can basically put my emotions aside and go headfirst, but it's something I have to watch, because sometimes I don't know how I feel about things... Until years later," she says, and laughs.

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Creative Thinking

Introvert Power To Be Creative

"When I began this book, I wanted to resolve the paradox of meditating in the mosh pit — to emancipate introverts from the constraints of an extroverted society. But the reality of the mosh pit woke me up to something new."
Psychologist Laurie Helgoe also writes in her book "Introvert Power" about her early life - perhaps you can relate, especially if you are introverted and/or highly sensitive:

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Identity

The Artist As Outsider

Being a misfit or outsider can be distressing or downright painful, especially as a teen, but many artists say it is part of their experience that helps them be more creative. Writer Anne Rice talks about being "a bad student, I daydreamed in class, wrote stories in my notebooks. I learned the basics, but most of my active intellectual life was outside of school. It was acutely painful because [my sister and I] felt different, like misfits. Our individuality was almost irrepressible, but I wanted to fit in."

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Identity

Margaret Keane: Overcoming Exploitation


In the 1960s, paintings of "sad-eyed children," massively reproduced in posters and cards, became possibly the best-selling art in the world for a time, thanks to the tireless marketing by Walter Keane of "his" work. The "big eyes" images were owned by celebrities and hung in many permanent collections.

But Walter Keane was a fraud and plagiarist: the art was actually created by his wife Margaret Keane.

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Creative Thinking

Fairy Tales and Bigger Truths


“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” ― Albert Einstein

Stories, perhaps especially the more elaborate and potent examples of fantasy and fairytale, can do more than entertain: they can reveal how others, and ourselves, manage being human. And how we can do better at it.

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Creative Thinking

Alan Turing: Exceptional Intellect and Asperger’s


British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing led a group of other brilliant codebreakers, including Joan Clarke, at Bletchley Park outside London during WWII to crack the German's Enigma code.

One of his biographers, professor S. Barry Cooper, writes that Turing “was a strange man, who never felt at ease in any place...He randomly adopted some conventions of his class, but rejected with no regret and hesitation most of their habits and ideas.

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Creative Thinking

Fear and Courage and Creating

"The artist begins with a vision — a creative operation requiring effort. Creativity takes courage." Henri Matisse
What fears and anxieties are holding you back from expressing yourself more creatively? Matisse and many other artists and psychologists note creative work requires courage or dealing with our fears.

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