Archives for Identity

Creative Thinking

Introvert Power To Be Creative

"When I began this book, I wanted to resolve the paradox of meditating in the mosh pit — to emancipate introverts from the constraints of an extroverted society. But the reality of the mosh pit woke me up to something new."
Psychologist Laurie Helgoe also writes in her book "Introvert Power" about her early life - perhaps you can relate, especially if you are introverted and/or highly sensitive:

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Identity

The Artist As Outsider

Being a misfit or outsider can be distressing or downright painful, especially as a teen, but many artists say it is part of their experience that helps them be more creative. Writer Anne Rice talks about being "a bad student, I daydreamed in class, wrote stories in my notebooks. I learned the basics, but most of my active intellectual life was outside of school. It was acutely painful because [my sister and I] felt different, like misfits. Our individuality was almost irrepressible, but I wanted to fit in."

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Identity

Margaret Keane: Overcoming Exploitation


In the 1960s, paintings of "sad-eyed children," massively reproduced in posters and cards, became possibly the best-selling art in the world for a time, thanks to the tireless marketing by Walter Keane of "his" work. The "big eyes" images were owned by celebrities and hung in many permanent collections.

But Walter Keane was a fraud and plagiarist: the art was actually created by his wife Margaret Keane.

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Creative Thinking

Fairy Tales and Bigger Truths


“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” ― Albert Einstein

Stories, perhaps especially the more elaborate and potent examples of fantasy and fairytale, can do more than entertain: they can reveal how others, and ourselves, manage being human. And how we can do better at it.

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Creative Thinking

Alan Turing: Exceptional Intellect and Asperger’s


British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing led a group of other brilliant codebreakers, including Joan Clarke, at Bletchley Park outside London during WWII to crack the German's Enigma code.

One of his biographers, professor S. Barry Cooper, writes that Turing “was a strange man, who never felt at ease in any place...He randomly adopted some conventions of his class, but rejected with no regret and hesitation most of their habits and ideas.

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Creative Thinking

Fear and Courage and Creating

"The artist begins with a vision — a creative operation requiring effort. Creativity takes courage." Henri Matisse
What fears and anxieties are holding you back from expressing yourself more creatively? Matisse and many other artists and psychologists note creative work requires courage or dealing with our fears.

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Identity

Pushed to Excel – Part 2

[Continued from Part 1]
What does creative excellence take?

In his article How to Win American Idol, psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman refers to research by Rena Subotnik and Linda Jarvin, who "interviewed over 80 top students at different stages of their musical careers and identified the traits important to succeed at every stage on the way to the top.

"The three abilities that were absolutely necessary as a baseline were intrinsic motivation, charisma, and musicality."

But for musicians at an "elite" level of talent, "technical proficiency mattered less and the following factors rose to prominence: self-promotion skills, having a good agent, capitalizing on strengths, overcoming self-doubt, exuding self-confidence, good social skills, persevering through criticisms and defeats, and taking risks."

How does a brutal teaching style impact those factors?
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Identity

Multitalented: So Many Choices

One of the myths of creative and multitalented people may be that they can choose whatever personal and career paths they want.
Having many interests and abilities can make for a rich and satisfying life, but also be a source of stress, especially at crossroads like choosing college majors.

Gifted education specialist Tamara Fisher quotes Bryant (a pseudonym), a graduating senior who lists his possible future careers as “applied psychologist, scientific psychologist, college teacher, philosophy, mathematics, architect, engineer.”
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Identity

Photography: Art and Healing

Photographic images can be a powerful form of expression for creative people, and also a tool for therapists and anyone to help explore our inner selves.

This image by artist Jennifer Moon is titled "A Story of a Girl and a Horse: The Search for Courage."

A news article about an installation of her photographs, sculpture and text-based works at UCLA Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. 2014" biennial, describes the piece as a "self-portrait, a chromogenic digital photo [that] depicts Moon on a chocolate brown horse, leaping over a bed of clouds shot through with electricity, as if she were riding a flying Unicorn."

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