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Entrepreneur

Self Care and Being Creative Part 2

[Continued from Part 1] Musician Henry Rollins commented about being a performer and staying healthy on road tours: “Eating well is becoming easier on the road as more places are health conscious. Gyms are easy to find anywhere there’s electricity and traffic. "Time is the hard part. I do my best and I learned a long time ago that without recuperative sleep, good nutrition and constant exercise, this high stress lifestyle of traveling, etc. quickly takes a toll. I just see it as a very important thing and make sure I get it done.” From my article Taking Care of Your Creative Self.
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Entrepreneur

Self Care and Being Creative

Many people feel inspired to pursue creative projects, even multiple ones at the same time. One potential downside is physical and emotional burnout. Good self-care is taking steps daily, even hourly, to stay replenished with the energy and positive attitude needed to be productively creative. One way is to slow down or shift our thinking about having “too much to do.” Entrepreneur coach Molly Gordon writes about this kind of shift:
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Entrepreneur

Lisa Sonora Beam On Success As A Creative Entrepreneur

"The act of making something new makes us vulnerable." That is a comment by artist and creative business consultant Lisa Sonora Beam, who writes in her book "The Creative Entrepreneur" about the variety of challenges that creative people face in developing a piece of artwork, a small business, or themselves as a writer or other artist - the central element of a creative endeavor. She notes people may "experience a kind of mythic divide" between their creative work and business practicalities. "This split can create tension and even trauma for the creative soul who is blessed with passion and purpose yet cursed by the seemingly mysterious realm of strategies and skills that are necessary to make an idea real." She notes that her book "addresses the three main issues that can result in creative business failure: emotional and psychological blockages, faulty thinking about the creative process, and a lack of practical business knowledge." One approach she finds very helpful for herself and clients is visual journaling: "It is one of the most powerful tools I know to gain insight, solve problems, and explore new ideas without the pressure to produce a product… it is an appealing and unique vehicle for entrepreneurial explorations. "If you have trouble with the word journal, call it a sketchbook or a notebook. Sketches and notes are never confused with the work they ultimately inspire."
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Entrepreneur

Eric Maisel on Dealing With Stress To Be More Creative

Creativity coach, author and psychologist Eric Maisel, PhD, notes "Some people become doctors, lawyers, accountants, or marketing executives. Some people stay at home and raise a family. "But millions of people make another sort of choice, maybe only as part-time employment if you count the money they earn but as their full-time identity: they become artists." And, he adds, "they struggle." [Quotes from his site www.makingyourcreativemark.com] In one of the chapters ("The Stress Key") of his new book "Making Your Creative Mark," he writes about how the creative life can be an ongoing source of stress - if we interpret or frame it as such.
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• Resources - Books Sites

How To Be More Creative

This series of posts on "How To Be More Creative" offers articles, books and other resources on developing creative thinking and innovation, and enhancing our creative expression. My other Creative Mind posts, hopefully, do that as well - but these new posts specifically provide brief excerpts of selected material by other authors that have a more "how to" flavor. Feel free to make any comments or suggestions. Creative Thinking: How to Be More Creative (with Science!) by Gregory Ciotti "Have you ever wished you were more creative? If you do creative work, have you ever suffered from a creative block and been stuck wondering what exactly is wrong, and how you can get yourself out of it?" ~~~~~~~~
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Entrepreneur

Being Bold Enough To Self-Publish

There are a number of examples of people bold enough and entrepreneurial enough to create and publish their own books, often leading to being traditionally published and marketed. Christopher Paolini began writing "Eragon" at the age of 15 and his parents decided to self-publish the novel, which was re-published by Alfred A. Knopf. "The Artist's Way" began as a collection of "tips and hints from different artists and authors" by Julia Cameron and Mark Bryan. After it was turned down by literary agency William Morris, they self-published it and it was later published by Jeremy Tarcher (Penguin) in 1992. The book was eventually put into the "Self-Publishing Hall of Fame" after "selling millions of copies worldwide." [Wikipedia] Author and personal development coach Tama Kieves self-published her first book "This Time I Dance!: Creating the Work You Love" and its level of popularity led to Tarcher/Penguin re-publishing new editions.
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Creative Thinking

Tony Wagner on Encouraging New Innovators

How can parents, educators and business leaders support people to become more creative, innovative and entrepreneurial? "Innovation-minded parents encouraged their children’s play, passion and purpose." Tony Wagner is currently the first Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology & Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard and the founder and former co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The quote above is paraphrased from his article My View: Creating innovators, in which he notes that many people believe that "America’s economic future depends on more students taking courses in science, technology, engineering and math." "However," he adds, "it is clear to me that the more important goal is for all students to graduate from high school or college 'innovation-ready,' and merely requiring students to take more of the same kinds of classes will not be adequate preparation."
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Entrepreneur

Creative? Introverted? Then You’re Probably Not Seen As A Leader

"People often avoid the uncomfortable uncertainty of novel solutions regardless of potential benefit." That quote comes from the Forbes magazine article Managing The Psychological Bias Against Creativity by Todd Essig, who notes the situation where "You come up with a great new idea at work, or at home. "Or a political leader actually tries something 'new and different' when faced with a previously intractable problem. But then, rather than grateful acceptance, or even a fair hearing, the idea is squashed, ridiculed, or otherwise ignored." New research, he says, "empirically documents how our resistance to uncertainty makes the 'old ways' far stickier than they should be given the practical benefits of creative, new solutions. "Once again, the biases built into our minds leave us simultaneously moving in opposite directions; we like creativity but avoid creative ideas because creative ideas are too, in a word, creative."
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Consciousness

Creative Thinking and Disruptive Innovation

Do we need to invest exceptional levels of time and attention in becoming experts before we can make significant creative contributions? One of the key ideas of author Malcolm Gladwell is that “outliers” on the upper end of intelligence, ability and achievement have engaged in about 10,000 concentrated hours of practice and study in a specific knowledge area. From my post Outliers and developing exceptional abilities. Malcolm Gladwell is author of Outliers: The Story of Success. But a new article by entrepreneur and philanthropist Naveen Jain, the founder of World Innovation Institute (among other credits) writes that while this may be "an interesting thesis" and perhaps true earlier, it may not apply "in today’s world of growing exponential technologies."
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Creative Thinking

Using The Skills of Disruptive Innovators

Einstein was expelled from school for “undermining the authority of his teachers and being a disruptive influence.” I was reminded of that item when reading the article Can Innovative Thinking Be Learned? (Forbes mag.), in which writer Erica Swallow lists several "disruptive innovators": Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson and Pierre Omidyar, referring to the book “The Innovator’s DNA" - which fortunately also includes a number of women innovators. She writes that they think and behave differently, and "possess a suite of skills that enable them to connect dots that the rest of us don’t usually perceive."
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