Archives for Entrepreneur

Creative Thinking

Transformational Writing and Sparking Creative Flow


Author, professor and CEO Ocean Robbins and his father John are examples of transformational writers. Ocean recalls:

"I was ten-years-old when my dad first began to write Diet for a New America. It was the first book to expose the truth about factory farms, and the link between food and our planet, to a wide audience. In the five years after the book’s publication in 1987, beef consumption in the United States dropped by 25%, and my dad received more than 50,000 letters from readers, thanking him for changing their lives.

"As we’ve seen in our family, sometimes writing can change the world."

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Creative Thinking

The Surreal Fashion Photography of Miss Aniela

Most of my limited experience of fashion photography has been the occasional magazine feature or ad, and the images typically seem to me mainly designed to document the clothing.

The work of London-based fashion photographer Natalie Dybisz, who works under the name Miss Aniela, is much more complex and intriguing.

Writer Sarah Bradley describes some of how Miss Aniela works:

"Blurring the lines between art, photography, and fashion, Miss Aniela’s collection of Surreal Fashion takes us to a mysterious place where the most elaborate and fantastical dreams come to life."

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Creative Thinking

Misfits and Innovators

“It’s better to be a pirate than to join the navy.” Steve Jobs
According to some writers and research, some of the "big names" of creativity and innovation share personal qualities with various sorts of "misfits."

In her Forbes magazine article, writer Erica Swallow refers to the book “The Innovator’s DNA” which lists several “disruptive innovators” including a number of creative and business leaders such as Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, Meg Whitman (eBay) and Sharon Aby (Beyond Ideas).

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Entrepreneur

Calling Yourself an Artist

How important is it to identify yourself as an artist - to others, and especially to yourself?

What if you don’t get awards for your creative work? What if it isn’t even seen by others?

Are you still an artist if you are doing something else for survival?

Psychologist Robert Maurer has worked with many creative people and researches the dynamics of success. He comments:

“The people who love their craft and see themselves as artists, and carry that identity through and study each day... are the people who thrive. To me, that's the only definition of success that matters.”

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Entrepreneur

Self Care and Being Creative Part 2

[Continued from Part 1]

Musician Henry Rollins commented about being a performer and staying healthy on road tours:

“Eating well is becoming easier on the road as more places are health conscious. Gyms are easy to find anywhere there’s electricity and traffic.

"Time is the hard part. I do my best and I learned a long time ago that without recuperative sleep, good nutrition and constant exercise, this high stress lifestyle of traveling, etc. quickly takes a toll. I just see it as a very important thing and make sure I get it done.”

From my article Taking Care of Your Creative Self.

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Entrepreneur

Self Care and Being Creative

Many people feel inspired to pursue creative projects, even multiple ones at the same time. One potential downside is physical and emotional burnout.

Good self-care is taking steps daily, even hourly, to stay replenished with the energy and positive attitude needed to be productively creative.

One way is to slow down or shift our thinking about having “too much to do.”

Entrepreneur coach Molly Gordon writes about this kind of shift:

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Entrepreneur

Lisa Sonora Beam On Success As A Creative Entrepreneur

"The act of making something new makes us vulnerable."

That is a comment by artist and creative business consultant Lisa Sonora Beam, who writes in her book "The Creative Entrepreneur" about the variety of challenges that creative people face in developing a piece of artwork, a small business, or themselves as a writer or other artist - the central element of a creative endeavor.

She notes people may "experience a kind of mythic divide" between their creative work and business practicalities.

"This split can create tension and even trauma for the creative soul who is blessed with passion and purpose yet cursed by the seemingly mysterious realm of strategies and skills that are necessary to make an idea real."

She notes that her book "addresses the three main issues that can result in creative business failure: emotional and psychological blockages, faulty thinking about the creative process, and a lack of practical business knowledge."

One approach she finds very helpful for herself and clients is visual journaling:

"It is one of the most powerful tools I know to gain insight, solve problems, and explore new ideas without the pressure to produce a product… it is an appealing and unique vehicle for entrepreneurial explorations.

"If you have trouble with the word journal, call it a sketchbook or a notebook. Sketches and notes are never confused with the work they ultimately inspire."

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