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Creative Thinking

Jamie Lee Curtis: Writing Is More Creatively Satisfying


Although acclaimed as an actor, Jamie Lee Curtis says she finds writing "way more" artistically satisfying for her than acting.

Her multiple children's books "address core childhood subjects and life lessons in a playful, accessible way," her Amazon.com bio notes.

One of those important subjects is adoption, which is the topic of "Tell Me Again About The Night I Was Born."

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Creative Thinking

How To Write Better and More: Advice From Authors


What gets in the way of our writing? There is no simple answer, of course, but here are some perspectives from accomplished authors on what to be aware of and what to do that may help write more and write better.

Stephen King relates an early experience that affected his writing and acceptance of himself as a writer – the kind of experience probably most of us have had to some degree: criticism from his high school teacher. He writes:

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Creative Thinking

Solitude To Be Creative


Some forms of creative expression – such as acting and filmmaking – involve collaborating with other people. But a number of artists make use of isolation and do their best creative work alone.

One example: George Orwell chose to write “Nineteen Eighty-Four” (from about 1946-1949) while living in Barnhill (photo), an abandoned farmhouse on the isle of Jura in the Inner Hebrides.

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Creative Thinking

Be Normal or Be Creative

“I don’t know what ‘normal’ means, anyway.”
How does being unusual or eccentric in our viewpoints, thinking, personal style and other choices help us be more creative and innovative?

Karl Lagerfeld, the prominent fashion designer, photographer, publisher, and artistic director of Chanel, has very eclectic and unusual tastes in clothing – so I would consider him one example of an eccentric creator.

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Consciousness

Drumming and Brainwaves and Creativity


There are many personal reports and research studies on how meditation can help people be more creative.

For example, In his post 5 Keys To Freeing Up Creativity From David Lynch, David Silverman comments that multitalented artist and movie director David Lynch has "talked about freeing up his subconscious to write screenplays using TM [Transcendental Meditation].

"He believes the process helps him catch ideas on a deeper level. He feels meditation expands his consciousness, giving him access to more and deeper information, which make hunting ideas more exciting."

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