Happiness Articles

Need a Mood Boost? Try this Simple Exercise

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

window opening of curtains

When my son was hospitalized a couple months ago for a respiratory problem, he was seen by many nurses and doctors. As my wife and I witnessed the medical personnel parade in and out of the room, the typical comments and advice was passed along.

But then, after a couple days, a trio of doctors came in and one of them did something different: With her Irish dialect she offered some observations of my son over the days. Amidst a handful of statements she made describing him, I caught the words: “vibrant,” “hard-working,” and “inquisitive.” Her exact words. My mind immediately went to the thought that she seemed to be spotting his character strengths. I was hearing particular character traits like “zest,” “perseverance,” and “curiosity

I asked her to explain her view of each observation. She readily did. She explained how he is full of energy and is always moving his arms and legs and turning his body with force (i.e., zest). She noted how he is quick to look around in the room, albeit a limited space, in an exploratory way, and is ready to interact with people when they approach him (i.e., curiosity). And, she added, he works hard at whatever challenge he is given whether it’s to reach a toy, sit up, or finish eating and that his congestion and wires hooked up to his body do not get in his way (i.e., perseverance).

Even though she was not aware of it, she was offering strengths-spotting. And this had an immediate positive effect on my mood. I felt lighter and happier. My perception of her, a physician looking at all aspects of my son and not just his illness, widened and strengthened. I will never forget that physician, or her Irish accent.

Oh, did I mention that at that time my son was only 8-months-old? Strengths-spotting can …


“Character Day” is Today: Join 1,500 Schools & Organizations

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Science of Character
You’ll be glad you spent 8 minutes watching this movie on YouTube here.

  • Who am I?
  • Who do I want to become?

These are questions asked by humans throughout history. You might be asking these questions yourself. Following the groundbreaking scientific VIA Classification of human strengths (which some call “The Periodic Table of Character Strengths”), there is now a framework for discussing these questions.

And, what would be a better way to explore character strengths than to watch a movie about it!?


A Happiness Strategy for the New Year

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

woman-happiness
Think about the best things in your life. What would your life be like without your supportive spouse, your good health, your house, or your college degree?

When it comes to creating more happiness in life, experts usually tell us to add more things—get a dog, build a friendship, add a gratitude list, etc. But, what about taking things away? Subtraction. Could that make us happier?


From Self-Criticism to Self-Inquiry

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Question mark - professional
Many times after a business or work meeting, especially those involving one-on-one interaction, I would leave the meeting and a voice in my head would say:

  • You should have said _____.
  • Why didn’t you bring up _____? Why did you hold back?
  • You could have been smoother when you were discussing ____.
  • The other person wasn’t receptive to my idea about ___. I should have explained it better.

And on and on my thinking would go.


Five Strengths for Greater Happiness

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

The science of positive psychology has revealed several character strengths that are particularly connected with higher levels of happiness. Over and over again studies show these five strengths might be considered “the happiness strengths”:


What is a Positive Relationship? 5 Tips from Before Midnight

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Before-Midnight-image
Ever think about what happens after “happily ever after”? Do the characters at the end of movies live in some sort of eternal bliss and glee?

Of course not. But as viewers we don’t get to see what happens next in these formulaic Hollywood films. There are exceptions.

Enter Before Midnight, a new romance-drama starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, and directed by auteur filmmaker, Richard Linklater. This is the third installment of films made about 10 years apart and follow two characters, Jesse and Celine, after their original chance encounter on a train heading to Vienna (see Before Sunrise and Before Sunset).

These films are known for engaging dialogue. Conversations that are “real,” poignant, and interesting. Characters share themselves, their ideas, and their opinions openly. They attack, praise, cajole, and surprise one another. We are carried through love and intimacy, thoughts about their relationship origins and life philosophies, the fruits and challenges of long-term commitment, and tense arguments.

Before Midnight is a quintessential “dialogue film.” This helps it be an outstanding “teacher” of positive relationships.


Strengths + Passion = Happiness

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Work happiness
I enjoy bringing my strengths to my work. I express my curiosity as I open up each new e-mail message, I express hope as I help clients work through struggles, and I express love (warmth and genuineness) with my colleagues as we discuss new ideas and process daily work happenings. This fills me with a greater passion and commitment to my work.

How about you? Do you express your highest character strengths each day at your job?

The research has been clear:


5 Practices for Effective Strengths-Spotting (Part 2 – Self)

Monday, January 28th, 2013

1391301435_AAA.jpg

What are your strengths?

What is best about you?

What qualities make up who you are?

Too many times in my work as a clinical psychologist these questions would be met by blank stares from the person in front of me. And, when the question was answered at all, the response was something vague like “I like baseball” or “I’m good at cooking.” This is consistent with survey research that has found that 2/3 of people do not have a meaningful awareness of their strengths.


Strengths-Spotting Your Way to Happiness (Part 1)

Monday, January 7th, 2013


Strengths-spotting is one of the best, initial activities that deepens our understanding of our strengths and the strengths of others.

There are 2 general levels to strengths-spotting:


7 New Strategies for Happiness in the New Year

Friday, December 28th, 2012


Just in time for 2013! Looking for a New Year’s resolution? Feeling a holiday lull? Wanting to increase your happiness?

New research from the science of positive psychology has found a number of practical exercises you can do to boost your happiness and decrease your depression.

Choose one of the following 7 exercises and practice it for 1 week:


 

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