Tag archives for research

Romantic Chemistry

Highlights from a talk by Larry Young about the brain chemistry of love.

From bonded-for-life prairie voles to human partnerships, chemistry plays a role in romantic attraction and staying with a mate. Lessons from research into the science of love may be useful for other applications in psychiatric conditions, including autism spectrum disorders.

An animated short excerpt from a presentation at the Brain Matters! conference held in Vancouver, BC in March,...
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Biomarker Brain Scans for Treatment Types

In a small study from Helen Mayberg and colleagues at Emory University, depressed participants were randomized to either a medication or CBT, and underwent PET scans before treatment.

Then the scans were analyzed to see if they were predictive of treatment response. The goal was to find a biomarker in order to determine in advance who will respond better to which type of treatment.

However, as The Neurocritic points out, often people respond to a combination of both psychotherapy...
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NIMH’s Thomas Insel on a New Understanding of the Brain

Director of the National Institute for Mental Health Thomas Insel gives a TED Talk on the new domain criteria research direction, and how an important first step is to reframe mental illness as brain disorders.

By doing so, diverse fields like psychology, cognitive science, molecular neuroscience, genetics, psychiatry, and more can work together toward a new understanding of the...
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How Stress Can Be Useful

New research from the University of Rochester reveals that not all stress is bad for us, and sometimes it can even be helpful, in the video "Why Some Stress Can Actually Be Good for You."

Assistant Professor of Psychology Jeremy Jamieson explains that when we think all stress is negative we interpret any sign of it (like butterflies in the stomach before public speaking) as being harmful.

"But those feelings just mean that our body is preparing to address a...
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Why LOLCats Enjoy Petting

In the cutest, funniest, educational science video you're likely to find, LOLCats are used to illustrate a report on a neuroscience study about why hairy mammals enjoy being stroked.

This brief and adorable production from Nature Video mixes LOLCat images with narration about a experiment with mice that found specific neurons are activated when they are stroked versus other physical sensations, and that when the mice were given a choice they preferred the stroking effect. Although the study didn't examine...
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Solving Homelessness

The Here At Home web documentary explores the mental health and homelessness research project At Home/Chez Soi. It's a five-site study that has housed about 1000 homeless participants with mental health issues, using the Housing First philosophy of providing services along with immediate housing rather than requiring people to access services before qualifying for housing. People receive rent subsidies or congregate housing along with mental health services delivered by either an outreach Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team or Intensive...
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Using Meditation to Change Emotional Response

Canadian neuroscientist and science writer Ward Plunet discusses new research on meditation in his debut YouTube video, "8 Weeks of Meditation Can Change How You Process Emotions."

In this brief and clear video, Plunet shares details from the study "Effects of mindful-attention and compassion meditation training on amygdala response to emotional stimuli in an ordinary, non-meditative state," Desbordes et al., Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012, DOI: Researchers worked with three groups, sending one to Mindful Attention Training...
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