Archives for Helping Loved One

Bipolar Stories

We Can Do Better: Bipolar in the Hospital

Recently, a young adult child of a friend of mine was admitted to a hospital for a first manic episode. She presented in the most typical of ways with sudden changes in energy, sleep, mood, thinking, behavior, and judgment. She did not see that there was anything wrong, but was eventually hospitalized, against her will, due to dangerous behaviors.
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Advocacy

CIT Not Just a Law Enforcement Program

I recently attended the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Indiana's Criminal Justice Summit in Indianapolis, IN. The morning's keynote speaker was Major Sam Cochran (ret.), who is nationally known for his work in developing the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model in Memphis, TN.

Cochran's message was clear: CIT is not just a law enforcement program; CIT is a community program and should be recognized as a community priority. It should involve not only law enforcement officers and dispatchers, but also prosecutors, judges, emergency room personnel, physicians, nurses, psychiatrists, therapists, the community mental health center, and other community resource centers.
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Advocacy

Supporting a Loved One Who’s in Prison

From Joe Kraynak, co-host of Bipolar Beat: I have been corresponding with a young man who is currently being held in a federal detention center (FDC). I asked him to share his insights and advice for how friends and family members can support a loved one with bipolar or another serious mental illness who is in prison. He wrote this post.
Everyone knows the importance of communication in maintaining one's emotional and psychological well-being. Communication is even more essential for those with bipolar disorder and other mental illnesses who may be confused about where they are and why and may even be experiencing paranoia and psychosis.
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Advocacy

Do You Hesitate to Call the Police?

Yesterday, I served on a panel of family members who have loved ones with mental illness, where we talked to a room full of police officers (approximately 30 of them) as part of their crisis intervention team (CIT) training. NAMI-WCI (West Central Indiana) provided the training.

As I prepared my story for the presentation, I realized that I am never the one who calls 911 when my wife is experiencing a manic episode. My wife has always been the one to call, usually because she is experiencing paranoia and psychosis and feels the need to call the police for protection.

This made me wonder... why?
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Anger

Defusing Confrontation with “I” Statements

Shortly after bipolar disorder invaded our home in 1999, a series of marriage counselors encouraged me to learn to speak in "I" statements. That was the advice I got from NAMI's 12-week Family-to-Family course, too.

My initial reaction was, "Great, not only am I a lousy husband, but now I can't even speak properly!" We had had 15 years of connubial bliss, relatively speaking, before the fireworks started, and I wasn't doing anything different, so how could this inability to communicate suddenly be my fault?! In short, I was very resistant to the idea.
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Advocacy

If You Want a Certain Outcome, You Need to Work for It

In the mental health community, we often find ourselves wringing our hands when our loved ones fall victim to a flawed system. Too often, I hear of stories from family members who do everything right and have everything turn out all wrong.

They take their loved one to the emergency room in a psychiatric crisis, and three hours later, the patient calms down and is released with no follow-up care in place. They contact their Community Mental Health Center only to be told that they need to contact an attorney, instead. They call around to psychiatric facilities and find out that no beds are available.

They call 911, and the police show up, arrest their loved one and file criminal charges.
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