Archives for Helping Loved One

Advocacy

Bipolar Excuse or Explanation: Does It Matter?

My wife, Cecie, has bipolar disorder. Recently, she got into some trouble at work over a policy she violated. Not that it's anyone's business, but I'd better explain what she did (with her permission, of course), so you don't imagine something worse than it is. Cecie is a teacher. She brought her new puppy to school for a couple days and had two (high school) students take it outside the school building (located in a very safe area) without signing out. She received a written reprimand over the incident, which I personally think was a little over the top, but so be it.
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Advocacy

Stop Trying to Stop Enabling Bipolar Behavior!

Sandra lives with bipolar disorder. I am her psychiatrist or p-doc or shrink (as in Dr. Fink, the shrink). Sandra (not her real name), and I have worked together for many years. At today's appointment, she is moving a little slowly due to some back pain, but she tells me that her mood and energy have remained steady. That is outstanding news, because until a couple of months ago she was experiencing a terrible mood episode that rocked her life—a difficult mixed episode (mania and depression), along with substance use and memory and thinking problems. Her symptoms disrupted relationships with her family and worsened existing financial troubles. But, fortunately, her mood and energy level have not wavered to any clinically significant degree. Today she smiles and tells me about her volunteer work and playing tennis with a friend. Then she stops, and she cries softly and asks me how to help her parents understand what is wrong with her.

While the good news is that many people in Sandra's life are starting to grasp that bipolar disorder is the problem (and that Sandra is not the problem), her own family of origin shuns and shames her, telling her that they have been advised to "stop enabling" her "bad behavior." They will not let her come to stay with them, and she has been excluded from family events. Sandra is heartbroken.
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Bipolar Stories

We Can Do Better: Bipolar in the Hospital

Recently, a young adult child of a friend of mine was admitted to a hospital for a first manic episode. She presented in the most typical of ways with sudden changes in energy, sleep, mood, thinking, behavior, and judgment. She did not see that there was anything wrong, but was eventually hospitalized, against her will, due to dangerous behaviors.
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Advocacy

CIT Not Just a Law Enforcement Program

I recently attended the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Indiana's Criminal Justice Summit in Indianapolis, IN. The morning's keynote speaker was Major Sam Cochran (ret.), who is nationally known for his work in developing the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model in Memphis, TN.

Cochran's message was clear: CIT is not just a law enforcement program; CIT is a community program and should be recognized as a community priority. It should involve not only law enforcement officers and dispatchers, but also prosecutors, judges, emergency room personnel, physicians, nurses, psychiatrists, therapists, the community mental health center, and other community resource centers.
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