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CIT Not Just a Law Enforcement Program

Monday, March 31st, 2014

I recently attended the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Indiana’s Criminal Justice Summit in Indianapolis, IN. The morning’s keynote speaker was Major Sam Cochran (ret.), who is nationally known for his work in developing the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model in Memphis, TN.

Cochran’s message was clear: CIT is not just a law enforcement program; CIT is a community program and should be recognized as a community priority. It should involve not only law enforcement officers and dispatchers, but also prosecutors, judges, emergency room personnel, physicians, nurses, psychiatrists, therapists, the community mental health center, and other community resource centers.


Opening Doors to Recovery Program in Georgia

Monday, March 17th, 2014

At our previous National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) meeting in Crawfordsville, IN, a couple participants mentioned that the state of Georgia provides a good model for how mental illness should be managed.

In Indiana, we don’t have a well-coordinated system in place to help people with mental illness find their way back into society from prison or homelessness. Georgia has a program called Opening Doors to Recovery that certainly seems to be what we should be striving for.

Here’s a YouTube video about the Opening Doors to Recovery program. Please watch it and post a comment to share your thoughts. Also, share any insights or information you have about similar programs in your state.

(If you can’t watch the video embedded on this page, view it on YouTube at www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2NJEL2WfCU.)


Bipolar Disorder Q&A: How to Get Help for a 24-Year Old with Bipolar

Monday, February 10th, 2014

hands

Kim Asks…

My nephew is 24 years old. He tried to kill himself. This has been going on since he was 17. Just Saturday he took 80-85 pills of antidepressant, very close call to his death but he made it. My questions is how can his mom and dad get help for him because of his age? He really needs to stay in the system, not at home, to be a better person.

Dr. Fink Answers…


NAMI Family-to-Family Course in Crawfordsville, IN

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Approximately a year ago, my wife, Cecie, and I along with a friend and neighbor Kitty Haffner, started a NAMI support group in Crawfordsville, IN. This Wednesday, Kitty and will start teaching the free 12-week Family-to-Family Education Program. This course is for people who have loved ones with a mental health diagnosis, including major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, and so on. For more info, check our our website, cvillenami.org.

If you have a loved one with mental illness, one of the best ways to help your loved one is to educate yourself. If you haven’t taken the Family-to-Family course, I strongly recommend you do. Check out the Family-to-Family Course Schedule to see if the course is being offered in your town or a town nearby.

If you’ve taken the course, please post a comment to share your opinion of it.


Do You Hesitate to Call the Police?

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

policecrpdYesterday, I served on a panel of family members who have loved ones with mental illness, where we talked to a room full of police officers (approximately 30 of them) as part of their crisis intervention team (CIT) training. NAMI-WCI (West Central Indiana) provided the training.

As I prepared my story for the presentation, I realized that I am never the one who calls 911 when my wife is experiencing a manic episode. My wife has always been the one to call, usually because she is experiencing paranoia and psychosis and feels the need to call the police for protection.

This made me wonder… why?


Bipolar Disorder Emergency: Send Police and an Ambulance

Friday, April 6th, 2012

The other day, I was looking through a very helpful publication entitled “What To Do in a Psychiatric Crisis in Indiana,” published by NAMI Indiana. I read it before and mentioned it in a previous post entitled “What To Do in a Psychiatric Crisis,” but what struck me this time was the discussion of calling 911. If you call 911 to report a psychiatric crisis, the dispatcher is most likely to send the police, and NAMI cautions:

It is important to note that depending on the police officer involved and other contingencies, s/he may take your loved one to jail instead of to the emergency room. Be clear about what you want to have happen.

That’s excellent advice, but wouldn’t it be better if you called 911 to report a psychiatric crisis, and instead of just the police an ambulance arrived, too? After all, bipolar disorder is an illness, and ambulances have medications that can calm a person down. Also, wouldn’t someone who’s experiencing a major mood episode be more inclined to voluntarily go away in an ambulance than in a squad car? Wouldn’t it be less stigmatizing?


Who Pays Your Bills?

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

paying billsSeveral years ago, when my wife was recovering from a major manic episode, she turned over the task of paying our bills and managing the checkbook to me.

We were just looking for ways I could help, and that was an easy one. The other day, however, I came across an article by Ginnie Graham published on the Tulsa World website entitled “Bill-paying program helps mentally ill avoid becoming homeless,” and it made me realize that missed payments could lead to major problems for those with bipolar who don’t have someone who can take on that task, especially during a major mood episode or during recovery.


NAMI Support Group in Crawfordsville, Indiana

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

hands in the air

Date: 2nd Thursday of every month starting May 10, 2012

Time: 6:30 – 8:00 pm

Place: Crawfordsville First United Methodist Church, 212 East Wabash Avenue, Crawfordsville, Indiana

Group type: For people with serious mental illness and family members and friends who have loved ones with serious mental illness

More info: Visit the Crawfordsville NAMI website for additional information.

(I posted the following when we were training to become NAMI support group facilitators and added the information above as we geared up to actually start our support group.)

My wife and I and one of our neighbor friends spent part of our weekend in Lafayette, Indiana training to become NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) support group facilitators. We’re planning to start a support group in our town, Crawfordsville, Indiana later this spring and offer a Family-to-Family course in the fall.

I’ve been to several NAMI support group meetings in Lafayette (and Indianapolis when we lived there), and I’ve found them to be very helpful. Even when everything is going well in my family and I don’t really need the support, spending time with others who’ve struggled with mental illness in their families and having an opportunity to help someone by sharing the knowledge I’ve acquired over the years feels great.

The meetings always start and end on time, and the facilitators have been very good about giving everyone a chance to speak and not allowing any attendee to monopolize the meeting.


What To Do in a Psychiatric Crisis

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

fragmented boyNAMI Indiana has some very valuable information about what to do in a psychiatric crisis in Indiana. It actually publishes a small book called What To Do in a Psychiatric Crisis in Indiana.

Along with that, you can go online at namiindiana.org, click What to do in a crisis, and click your county to find out which Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) to contact, the number to call for police, whether the police have Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officers who are trained to respond to people experiencing a mental health crisis, and additional helpful information.

Basically, what you do is contact people who can help:


Be Prepared

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

pill bottleWhen you’re experiencing a major mood episode, having key information available is essential to ensure that everyone on your treatment team is brought into the loop and the doctor on call has detailed information about your medications.

If everything’s on an even keel right now, you probably don’t want to think about the possibility of a future crisis, but a period of relative calm is the best time to prepare.

Prepare an information sheet that contains all of the following information:


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Candida Fink, M.D. and Joe Kraynak are authors of
Bipolar Disorder for Dummies.


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