Archives for Antipsychotic

Antipsychotic

Do Antipsychotics Work by Affecting Gene Function in Bipolar?

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered that antipsychotics may work, at least in part, by restoring normal gene function in people with bipolar disorder. (Chen, H., Wang, N., Zhao, X., Ross, C. A., O’Shea, K. S. and McInnis, M. G. (2013), "Gene expression alterations in bipolar disorder postmortem brains." Bipolar Disorders, 15: 177–187. doi: 10.1111/bdi.12039)

The research team did post-mortem (after death) examinations on the brains of three groups of people:

People with bipolar disorder who never took antipsychotics
People with bipolar disorder who had taken antipsychotics
People without bipolar disorder (the control group)
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Antipsychotics More Effective for Treating Acute Mania

A study published last week entitled "Comparative efficacy and acceptability of antimanic drugs in acute mania: a multiple-treatments meta-analysis" (Cipriani et al The Lancet 17 Aug 2011) reviewed many previous trials of medications for mania. It looked at results for any of the following medications: Aripiprazole (Abilify) , asenapine (Saphris), carbamazepine (Tegretol) , valproate (Depakote) , gabapentin (Neurontin), haloperidol (Haldol), Lamotrigine (Lamictal), lithium, Olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal) , topiramate (Topamax), and Ziprasidone (Geodon).
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Antipsychotic

Study Suggests Ziprasidone Less Effective in Treating Acute Mania in Patients with Obesity

At a recent meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, researchers presented a study suggesting that ziprasidone (Geodon) was less effective in treating acute mania in people with obesity or hyperglycemia (very high blood sugar level). The study was funded by Pfizer, which makes Geodon, and was done by looking at pooled data from previous studies performed by Pfizer looking at this medication's effectiveness.

The lead author of the study, Roger S. McIntyre, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto, indicated that while the findings could be related to a need for higher doses in people with higher body mass indexes, it could also be that these differences in body mass and blood sugar could reduce the effectiveness of the drug at any dose. While this type of study is apparently uncommon in psychiatric research, it is actually quite important in helping us understand patterns of effectiveness in various medications used to treat bipolar disorder.
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Evidence for Abilify (Aripiprazole) in Maintenance of Bipolar Disorder Questioned

Abilify (aripiprazole) is an atypical antipsychotic medication commonly used to treat schizophrenia and acute mania. In 2005, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved its use in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder – to prevent the recurrence of mood episodes. Unfortunately, evidence proving the effectiveness of Abilify as a maintenance medication for bipolar disorder is scarce and questionable.
Exposing the Truth
An article published this week in the open access journal
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Antipsychotic

Long-Term Antipsychotic Use May Reduce Brain Volume

Until recently, doctors and researchers had believed that brain volume loss in schizophrenia was caused primarily by the disease itself. One recent study, however, questions this long-held belief and identifies antipsychotics, the medications most commonly used to treat schizophrenia, as the more likely culprits.

With the increased long-term use of antipsychotics to treat schizophrenia and other forms of mental illness, especially bipolar mania, it's important to determine whether the illness or the medication (or both) contribute to the potential loss of brain volume.

In an article published in the Archives of General Psychiatry (February, 2011) entitled "Long-term Antipsychotic Treatment and Brain Volumes," Beng-Choon Ho, MRCPsych, et al. conclude the following:
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Antipsychotic

FDA Update on the Use of Antipsychotics During Pregnancy

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing healthcare professionals that it has updated the Pregnancy section of drug labels for the entire class of antipsychotic drugs. The new drug labels now contain more and consistent information about the potential risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal signs or EPS) and withdrawal symptoms in newborns whose mothers were treated with these drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy.
For details,...
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