Archives for Bipolar

Bipolar

How satisfied are the partners of patients with bipolar disorder in their marital and sexual life?

Bipolar disorder is considered a serious mental disorder, which is characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania, depression, and mixed episodes. Sometimes the episodes can be a traumatic experience for the patients who experience the disorder, but they can also be equally traumatic for their partners. A related study by Professor Lam and his colleagues (2005), attempted to explore the difficulties faced by the partners of bipolar patients. They examined the marital difficulties and the sexual satisfaction through the most important phases of their bipolar disorder (euthymic, manic and depressive).

Previous studies have shown that the partners of bipolar patients feel constrained due to problematic behaviors of their parterns ("he is insensitive), due to perceived control by patients in their disorder ("he is bad and he is not a patient"), and finally a significant reported problem has been the reduction in the income and activities due to the illness. It is worth noting that efforts to reduce the restriction felt by partners, can contribute to the improvement of patient’s quality of life (Clarkin et al., 1990, 1998).

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Bipolar

Physical Activity and Bipolar Disorder: A double edged sword?

Little is known about the benefits that exercise can offer in patients who are suffering from Bipolar Disorder. Over the past years little research has been conducted and this has been limited. Generally, physical activity has been found to reduce the risk of several diseases and to improve well-being. As for the mental spectrum evidence shows that exercise has significant benefits in unipolar depression (mild to moderate) but the evidence is limited.

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Bipolar

Electronic monitoring helps treatment adherence in Bipolar disorder

Non-adherence in the treatment of bipolar disorder is a very common phenomenon, which has been addressed by various researchers. The negative consequences may include relapse, hospitalization, impairment in everyday functioning, and it can be costly.

In a recently published pilot study by Wenze, Armey, and Miller (2014), the improvement of treatment adherence in bipolar disorder was tested using Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs). More specifically, the investigators wanted to test whether an intervention that utilized mobile technology and assisted the monitoring of bipolar disorder would be feasible and acceptable by bipolar patients.
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Bipolar

Bipolar and Depressed. What’s the rush?


In our clinical work at BipolarLab, we often come across bipolar patients who seek help when they are depressed. Depression may be the most common symptom, and the most frequent episode of bipolar disorder, but it is not always the most urgent phase to treat. Manic episodes may be more urgent, and more dangerous. Nevertheless, it takes an experienced, and a well trained bipolar patient to seek help once manic. Depressive episodes with increased suicidal ideation or psychotic symptoms can be equally urgent, but for the most common depressive episodes urgency is a matter of choice.
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Bipolar

Setting up and running an evidence based clinical e-practice: BipolarLab.com

Setting up and running an evidence based clinical e-practice in the field of mental health is an exhilarating challenge!
In other fields of medicine, this may not be the case, but in the mental health world, evidence based practice is a relatively new development.
"Evidence-based practice" means we conduct our clinical practice based on evidence that we've acquired from clinical research. Similar to drug research, your doctor will usually prescribe medications that've been tested thoroughly through many trials, and have been proven to benefit your health condition. Once upon a time, your therapy could've been based on Dr. Ego’s clinical expertise, big name or great insights, but thankfully these days such practices are slowly becoming a nightmare of the past (although, drug companies still invest on armies of Dr. Egos “aka opinion leaders” to influence your local doctor’s prescription practices).
However, evidence-based practice is a fairly recent development in the field of mental health, and especially in the field of psychotherapy. The rise of behavioral therapy in the 60s, partly as a reaction to the psychoanalytic status quo, and later its marriage with cognitive therapy, have given us a remarkable new tradition of true evidence-based psychotherapeutic practice.
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Bipolar

Bipolar Disorder: A First Rate Madness?

I recently attended one of the lovely webinars hosted by the International Bipolar Foundation. The speaker, Dr Nassir Ghaemi (Professor at Tufts university), presented his book, a "First Rate Madness: Mood disorders and Crisis Leadership" and discussed the issue of leadership and mood disorders.
According to his talk, people with mood disorders, as well as in general mentally abnormal people, make better leaders -- especially at times of crisis. He gave examples of many American and European political leaders who achieved "greatness," and their psychohistory suggests also had a mental disorder - in most cases a bipolar disorder.
I have trouble digesting this argument; not for personal reasons, I also love my bipolar patients and wish to think and speak well of them, but for scientific reasons.
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Bipolar

Bipolar Fleas and Early Warning Signs!

It's that time of the year again - spring. Our interest in life literally springs up, our moods and love life improve and many patients with bipolar disorder begin to experience their first signs of hypomania.

Call it a seasonal effect, blame it on light or the forthcoming changes in our social routines, spring appears to be a period that every bipolar and their family should keep an eye on.

So what better time than now to write about our bipolar fleas - the early warning signs of manic and depressive relapses?

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