Cultus Lake SunsetThe first time I encountered tapping, I was at my therapist’s office in the spring of 2011. I’m usually one of those pessimists that think that alternative techniques to mental health will never work.

And I didn’t believe in tapping for a while.

However, I’m here to tell you today that although I have only been tapping regularly for the last few months, I can see a big difference in the way I feel after I do it.

But what is tapping, you ask?

Also called the Emotional Freedom Technique, tapping is derived from the ancient principles of Chinese acupuncture. Based on meridian energy points on the face, body, and hands, but without the use of needles, tapping therapy allegedly accesses the “emotional memories” in your body.

By physically touching the affected meridian points, EFT tapping allows you to release negative energy.

I know you’re skeptical. I was even skeptical when my mom started taking EFT classes, because she’s taken to a host of weird subjects. However, the more I experienced it within therapy, the more convinced I am of its power.

The great thing about EFT is that it doesn’t require any sort of equipment, and you can do it anywhere. For instance, I have done it at work, at my parents’ house during parties, and other public places. No one has to see you tapping under the table.

One of my favorite places to tap is in the region between my thumb and pointer finger. Another good spot is my forehead, or a certain spot on the breast bone of my chest. There are many areas you can use for different situations or preferences.

I use tapping primarily for anxiety, but it can be used for a host of emotions. One of the great parts of EFT is that you also utilize positive reinforcement/positive thoughts while engaging in the tapping technique.

My therapist taught me to use phrases like “Even though I am anxious, I totally and completely accept myself.” You can create your own reinforcement that works for you.

Tapping enthusiasts also boast that this technique can reduce food cravings, reduce or eliminate pain, and implement positive goals and choices.

Proper EFT Tapping

It’s all in the fingertips—you will be tapping with your fingers. There are a number of acupuncture meridians on your fingertips, so when you are tapping, you are actually tapping on meridian points times two.

Traditional EFT will have you tapping with the fingertips of your index finger and middle finger, with only one hand. It doesn’t matter which side you use, or if you switch sides. For example, you can tap under your right eye, and then your left arm.

Many obtain successful results, however, with only one finger. It depends, again, on your personal preference.

Tap solidly, but don’t hurt yourself. You should never be bruising yourself!

And you might want to remove accessories such as glasses and/or watch before starting EFT.

Finally, as I said, tapping can be done in public. Adjust as needed. You might have to say your positive affirmations under your breath or silently. People will, in all likelihood, not even notice at all.

Try Tapping Now!

Tapping.com features videos that show you how to tap, from tapping for stress relief to tapping for forgiveness.

Tell me what you think of your first tapping session. Give it some time to sink in and try again! It’s wildly effective, and seems to be quite the rage for scholars of positivity and health.

 


Creative Commons License photo credit: `James Wheeler

 


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    Last reviewed: 7 Feb 2013

APA Reference
Dawkins, K. (2013). Bipolar and the Art of Tapping. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 23, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/bipolar-life/2013/02/bipolar-and-the-art-of-tapping/

 

 
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