The Experts Are Asking The Wrong Questions About Depression And Bipolar Disorder. Over the last ten years I have spoken with thousands of people diagnosed with bipolar disorder. When I ask them to relate their story of how they were diagnosed, a troubling pattern is pretty evident; the diagnosis was very brief and largely irrelevant in regards to bringing any hope to the situation. Most people I have talked with see the assessment as a life sentence with no path for making life work the way they had hoped for. I wonder where they got that idea? For the last five years I have been speaking to groups of therapists and doctors. When I tell them assessments are not thorough enough they are often in agreement about others, but believe their own assessments are very thorough and use the best evidence-based tools available. What tools? The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) takes about 10 to 15 minutes to complete the 21 questions in a self-report format including the items intended to measure symptoms of severe depression that would require hospitalization. The BDI has been used for 35 years and is reported as being highly reliable regardless of the population. The Hamilton Depression Scale asks only 17 questions. There are others, of course, but none provide the insight needed to achieve Depression IN Order or Bipolar IN Order.
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