bbq pillsI went to see my therapist and psychiatrist today (two separate people in one office suite). I talked with my therapist about the results of my liver tests and ultrasound and she was proud of the steps I am taking in order to be physically healthy as well as mentally well.

I was kind of dreading seeing my psychiatrist because I worried that with my current liver condition we would have to change my meds – the meds that have kept me from a full blown-she-needs-to-be-hospitalized-manic-episode for a couple of years now. Please don’t take that to mean that I am cured and that everything is butterflies and ice cream cones. I still deal with a lot of my symptoms, but these meds have kept me out of the hospital, and for that I am grateful.

He told me that unfortunately all my meds go through my liver. No way around that one. He bent over several books, rubbing his forehead, reading aloud to me, that there was no need to change my current dosages based on my liver numbers. So, for now, the meds stay the same, well, except for one small change.

“I’m having these obsessive thoughts about running people over,” I said. This is a newer OCD manifestation, one that didn’t even exist the last time I saw him 2 months ago.
“It’s like, if there is a motorcyclist or someone walking on the sidewalk next to the street or someone riding their bike, I KNOW I am going to run them over.”

“Do you wanna up your Prozac?” he asked.

“I dunno. What do you think?”

“Well, I think it will help with the obtrusive thoughts in addition to what you are working on with your therapist.”

“Yeah. She has me talking to myself. It goes like this – ‘You are not going to run over that man. You have never run over anyone. You will never run over anyone. Now you are passing him. He’s still safe. Now he is behind you and you can’t run over him.’”

“That’s good, self-talk is good.”

“Let’s up your Prozac and see if that helps.”

So, ladies and gents, up the Prozac goes, which I always am leery to do because antidepressants in bipolar patients can bring on mania. But, I am on a couple mood stabilizers and my doctor thinks I will be fine – and if not he works 6 days a week and is just a phone call away.

 

Image courtesy of holohololand / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 


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    Last reviewed: 2 Jul 2014

APA Reference
Martin, E. (2014). “Let’s up your Prozac.”. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 2, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2014/07/02/lets-up-your-prozac/

 

 

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