General

For Efficient Studying, Clear the Decks!


I hear more and more students complaining about the hours they're spending on homework, and how long they study for tests (but then they still don't do well).

The culprit is almost always multi-tasking.

Human brains are simply not built to do more than one thing at a time. This is true for young people just as much as for adults.

These very same students will insist that texting, listening to music, and watching TV help them study. But what's really happening is
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Education

5 Ways To Get Support During Final Exams



It's best to study at the library!

High school students are facing final exams now, and many feel anxious, confused and isolated.

Exam preparation is your responsibility, but that doesn't mean you need to go it alone! The best exam preparation involves reaching out for support from other people and resources:

Let parents help. During stressful times, support from other people can be invaluable. Let your parents remind you to...
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Emotions and Feelings

4 Tips to Reduce Final Exam Anxiety

Relax and look forward to summer by getting on top of your exam preparation.

The school year is coming to a close, but high school students first need to make it through final exams.

Try these strategies to get a handle on your anxiety and help exam season go smoothly:

Get started now! Anxiety builds as you worry and do nothing. It may feel very difficult to get started, but you will feel immediate relief once...
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General

The Teenage Brain is Primed for Learning

What was he thinking?

Is there a parent out there who can't relate to the first sentence of The Teenage Brain, by Frances E. Jensen, MD?

She's a neuroscientist specializing in adolescent brain development and the mother of two teenage boys, and her book is "a survival guide" full of important information about how brains develop, what's going on inside the skulls of adolescents, and what this means for how we parent and educate our teens and young adults.

I've just started reading this book, and here are a few of the nuggets I've already discovered:
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Education

The Blood, Sweat and Tears of Middle School Math

Many middle school students struggle with math, often for the first time.

Math becomes harder in middle school, and teacher expectations are higher. These changes are appropriate as kids mature; the achievement bar must be raised so that students' intellects are challenged to grow. The teacher who waters down instruction so that it's always easy and "fun" isn't doing students any favors.
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Education

ADHD Types I and II?

One of my students included this very interesting 9-minute TED talk in a psychology class project.

The speaker proposes that, as with diabetes, there are now arguably two forms of ADHD. We could call the inborn variety ADHD Type I; Type II would be what one doctor calls "Acquired Attention Deficit Disorder", developed through excessive Internet use.
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General

The Wisdom to Know the Difference (Day Twelve: Twelve Days of Wisdom)

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
The courage to change the things I can,
And the wisdom to know the difference.
-The Serenity Prayer
I like Victorian-era cemeteries, and whenever I visit one the Serenity Prayer enters my mind.

In those days there was no cure for tuberculosis, which was romantically called "consumption" and which along with other infectious diseases filled the churchyards and necessitated the creation of vast new burying grounds.

Victorian cemeteries were intended as parks where families could picnic and visit their departed loved ones on Sunday afternoons.
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