Archives for Learning

General

The Teenage Brain is Primed for Learning

What was he thinking?

Is there a parent out there who can't relate to the first sentence of The Teenage Brain, by Frances E. Jensen, MD?

She's a neuroscientist specializing in adolescent brain development and the mother of two teenage boys, and her book is "a survival guide" full of important information about how brains develop, what's going on inside the skulls of adolescents, and what this means for how we parent and educate our teens and young adults.

I've just started reading this book, and here are a few of the nuggets I've already discovered:
Continue Reading

Education

The Blood, Sweat and Tears of Middle School Math

Many middle school students struggle with math, often for the first time.

Math becomes harder in middle school, and teacher expectations are higher. These changes are appropriate as kids mature; the achievement bar must be raised so that students' intellects are challenged to grow. The teacher who waters down instruction so that it's always easy and "fun" isn't doing students any favors.
Continue Reading

Book Lists

You Can Become a Better Person (Day Seven: Twelve Days of Wisdom)

It’s not about how to achieve your dreams. It’s about how to lead your life. If you lead your life the right way, the karma will take care of itself. The dreams will come to you. -Randy Pausch

I make my living working with kids, and it’s my impression that most of them have little clue as to what they want to do with their lives, and that they find the very question terrifying.
Continue Reading

Emotions and Feelings

Day Two: Emotions affect reasoning. (Twelve Days of Wisdom)

People use words as weapons, to defend themselves. It is common for people to attack with anger when they are afraid and to become insulting when they are hurt or jealous.  -Dr. Shirley Glass

When we are anxious or angry we can’t think straight. This means we ought to avoid taking action or having heavy conversations while immersed in these mood states.

The emotions of fear and anger trigger our internal fight-or-flight mechanism, which sends epinephrine (adrenalin) gushing through our bloodstream. Our heart races, our blood pressure shoots up, our platelets ready themselves to clot in case we are injured...and our higher-level thinking skills shut down. After all, it doesn’t take a lot of brainpower to run from a saber-toothed tiger.
Continue Reading

Education

Why Vocabulary and Facts Are So Important

How do you know all the words without looking at the back of the cards? 

A fifth grade student was amazed that I knew every word on the American Heritage Dictionary's Top 100 Words Every Middle Schooler Should Know  list. She only recognized five.

I assured her that soon she would also know these words, because we were about to begin learning them now.The authors explain why knowing these words is so important:
Continue Reading

Education

Don’t Fall Off the Physics Bus!

My kids attended Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, where their wonderful physics teacher started off every school year with his infamous warning: Don't fall off the physics bus!

He was playfully reminding students that physics is a cumulative subject, in which you've got to make sure and master the material all along the way.

If you don't thoroughly understand and gain fluency in each chapter, especially the early ones, you won't have built up the foundation of knowledge and skills needed to handle the later material. Month after month, chapter after chapter, that physics bus will keep on rolling down the physics road, and if you fall off you'll have a heck of a time catching up with it.
Continue Reading

Education

How to Study: 5 Basic Practices for Academic Success


Many students complain that they don't know how to study, so I've compiled this short and sweet page of the basics.

Perhaps now, as the first grading quarter winds to a close, is a good time to read down this list and get back on track with these five essential good-student behaviors:
How to Study
Five Basic Practices for Academic Success


Do all your homework, on time, every day. Teachers assign homework so as to give you the practice you need to learn and remember the material. The single most important thing you can do to understand better, remember more, and score higher grades is to always do all your homework thoroughly (even the “optional” stuff) and on time.


Continue Reading