Creativity often times drives me crazy, because I don’t follow the rules and I have some trouble staying in the lines.

When I was in grade school, I remember making a paper mache duck for my dad that only had one wing. People thought that was a bit odd but I thought my duck was cool, and just because by the time I got to the other wing I was ready to wrap up the project doesn’t mean it wasn’t artistically significant! Although I have to say the ridicule of my artistic abilities got to me a bit, and I started shielding others from my creative expression.

I’ve come to realize the benefit of art is that it allows you to express yourself creatively, and while people always judge art comes in all shapes and sizes.  Painting and paper mache may not be my thing, but I have found photography to be an incredibly rewarding experience – one that takes advantage of my quick mind and unique perspective.  And then I came across the best creative exercise for me yet – a manifestation board.It truly seems to be a project that was made for me and my ADHD. I get a bunch of magazines, sift through them cutting out things that speak to me and what I want to create in life. This can be words, expressions, looks, colors, places, friends, habits, etc.  I then arrange it all as I am inspired, glue it to a big board, and marvel at the creation.   Somehow, in the end, it seems just perfect.

The added bonus is that when I did it last year I actually manifested what was on my board the following year.  I’m very serious, and I didn’t even realize it until I started working on my board this year. I’ve accomplished things in the past year most people would have said was totally impossible.

My unique twist to a manifestation board is to take a photo of the board, and use it as the basis for the middle of the next board. That way, each time you do it, your board will contain everything you ever wanted to manifest (even tiny tiny tiny) so you can stay on track and don’t lose what you have created.

It is difficult for those with ADHD to excel at artistic endeavors, as many require patience, discipline, and focus. That is why this exercise resonates so closely with me – it allows me to be impulsive, out of the box, and unfocused. Yet in the end, I can sit back and be proud of what I have achieved.

I may take the road less traveled, but I still reach my destination.

 


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    Last reviewed: 29 Mar 2011

APA Reference
Goetzke, K. (2011). A Fantastic Artistic and Creative Exercise for ADHD thrivers. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 23, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd/2011/03/a-fantastic-artistic-and-creative-exercise-for-adhd-thrivers/

 

 

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