Psych Central


The Disorganized Mind, Coaching Your ADHD Brain to Take Control of Your Tasks, Time, and Talents, by Nancy RateyHoly Moly! The last self-coaching progress report I wrote was on February 23, 2011. Nearly one year ago! I had no idea that much time had passed since my last update.

Funny, I’ve been thinking about reporting for a couple of months now, but didn’t because I didn’t want to bore you with all my self-coaching posts. Sheesh. You must have thought I’d fired my coach!

The best news is that I’ve been so busy actually working on my goals, I haven’t been thinking about managing them. The downside is, I probably could have been more efficient (and productive) had I paid more attention to my self-coaching program.

Still, given how traumatic and eventful 2011 was, miraculously, I’m delighted with where I’m at.

I’d love to hear about your year, and any new tips you’ve discovered to keep you on track, and help you to maximize your potential. Here are some that have worked for me, and some areas I’m still working on.

first, I had to jog my memory

In preparation for this update, I read over my last Self-Coaching Report. There are some pretty good tips there, so if you haven’t read it, I’d encourage you to do so.

If you’re not familiar with the concept of self-coaching, please refer to my previous blog post(s) with ADD coaching guru Nancy Ratey, author of The Disorganized Mind. It was Ratey’s book that inspired me to attempt self-coaching (that, and I couldn’t afford a real coach).

what a year can bring…

Also to prep for this report, I reviewed my analysis and the goals that I’d set based on The Disorganized Mind.

While I set immediate, short-term, 3-month, 6-month, and long-term goals, I neglected to date them. Oops.

One of the things I liked the most about The Disorganized Mind is that it takes a holistic approach. Each area of one’s life is considered. Here is a brief report of how I’m doing in the five areas identified in Ratey’s book.

section 1 – professional life

Under the question, What problems do I experience in my job? I listed 13 items. Of these, I’ve eliminated 7, improved upon 2, and feel that 4 of them could use more attention.

section 2 – physical health

I still want to exercise more and get into better physical condition, but these aren’t immediate priorities. I’ve started doing 15-30 min. of yoga most mornings, and that’s improved my overall health.

section 3 – social life

I’m curbing my social activities in lieu of writing my book (a memoir) on women and ADHD, and to take advantage of a few other fantastic, and timely, opportunities that have come my way. On the other hand, I’m working hard to keep my friendships. So far, so good.

I had originally identified 10 stressors. …7/10 of these have either been eliminated, or significantly reduced.

section 4 – spiritual life and sense of well-being

One question in this section was, What stressors are present in my life? I had originally identified 10 stressors. I’m happy to report that 7/10 of these have either been eliminated, or significantly reduced. Woo hoo!

section 5 – financial life

On the positive side, I still have the same part-time work, I did a lot more freelance writing last year, and I’m living in the same apartment (which means I haven’t incurred the expense of moving – again). I’ve also eliminated 90% of my debts.

I’m being true to my “mission statement,” which is to “completely commit myself to writing …” I’ve been able to reframe my perceptions of my financial life through writing my blog post, The Top 10 Happiest Jobs – Not Just For ADHDers!  When I discovered that “book author” was #4 on the list, and confirmed that most authors aren’t making much (if any) money, somehow that eased my worries that my ADHD had sabotaged my income. Nope, at least not entirely. The stereotype is sad, but true: writing books is not what you’d call the most lucrative of professions – ADHD or not.

Tomorrow, in Part II, I’ll review my progress on tangible goals and share some productivity tips that you can use.

Stay tuned!
Follow ChickADD44 on Twitter

 


Comments


View Comments / Leave a Comment

This post currently has 0 comments.
You can read the comments or leave your own thoughts.






    Last reviewed: 27 May 2012

APA Reference
Kessler, Z. (2012). 2012 ADHD Self-Coaching Progress Report – Part I. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 19, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-zoe/2012/02/2012-adhd-self-coaching-progress-report-part-i/

 

ADHD
From A to Zoë



Subscribe to this Blog:
Feed

Archives



More on
ADHD



ADHD According to Zoe
ADHD According to Zoe
Check out Zoë Kesslers's brand new book,
ADHD According to Zoë, as well as her previous bestseller, Adoption Reunions.

Subscribe to this Blog: Feed

Recent Comments
  • Klara: Sadly, dealing effectively with children with ADHD, is too confounding for many uninformed, impatient parents...
  • Jonelle141: I will definately let you know if I decide to get that truck. Now I’m hyper focusing on that truck...
  • eventer79: Well, us owl-touchers (I love that term, I am totally keeping it, haha!) have to stick together you know!...
  • Zoë Kessler, BA, B.Ed.: Thanks for your support, Jonelle. And way to go on using positive self-talk in curbing your...
  • Zoë Kessler, BA, B.Ed.: “… there is nothing wrong with touching a dead animal.” Hurrah! You have...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 12240
Join Us Now!