Chick A-D-D Zoë Kessler, 1962

Chick A-D-D Zoë, Christmas, 1962 (I'm the little drama queen in the front)

I’ve been feeling pretty nostalgic this Christmas. In particular, I’m remembering what it was like being a hyperactive little girl with undiagnosed ADHD.

Based on on my research and my experience as an adult with ADHD, I’d like to suggest the following gifts that parents can give to their ADHD kids, both during the holidays and throughout the year.

I know these gifts aren’t “one size fits all,” but I’m pretty sure most of them would have been great for me. Maybe some (or all) of them would be good for your son or daughter, too.

1 )  your time

More than anything else, kids with ADHD want to feel connected. Spending quality time with your child is worth more than anything you can wrap up and put under the tree. Spend time sharing activities that your child enjoys; your support and encouragement will go a long way in helping your son or daughter build self-confidence and trust in their own talents and abilities.

2 )  understanding

Help your child manage their ADHD symptoms over the holiday; a gift for the whole family!

Holidays are a time when routines go out the window; that can stress out a kid with ADHD. Try to keep your child in the loop by letting them know what’s going on, what’s going to happen, and that it’s ok for them to take time out if they’re overwhelmed.

Throughout my childhood, I frequently removed myself from family gatherings. The din of music, a million conversations going on at once, kitchen sounds, animals and other kids running around, drove me crazy. I’d lock myself in an upstairs bathroom; sit in an empty bedroom; or go for a walk down the road (while freezing in the cold Canadian winters) to get away and re-group.

I think it’s great that I took care of myself. I don’t think it’s great that I felt so alone. It would have been great had my folks known about my ADHD and hypersensitivity and been able to give their support, understanding, and encouragement.

You have the chance to give your sensitive ADHD child the gift of understanding at Christmas. Try to be aware of what they’re feeling; support them during new or out-of-the-ordinary experiences, such as parties and social events; encourage them to do what they need to do.

3 )  control

Let your ADHD child decide what movie to watch as a family over the holidaysDuring the holidays, your child with ADHD may feel even less in control of their life (and symptoms). Give them a role to play, perhaps by helping in the kitchen or setting the table. Let them decide what’s for dessert; let them pick what holiday movie they want to share as a family; this will give them back some control over what’s happening.

4 )  transition time

People with ADHD need more time to switch from one activity to another. If you’re frantically getting ready to go to a family gathering, or trying to get a meal on the table for company, don’t leave notifying your child until the last minute. Make it a priority to give your son or daughter enough time to finish what they’re doing, to mentally prepare for what’s coming next, and to join you in the next activity. And remember that this might take longer than it would for others (1/2 hour’s notice; then a 15-minute heads-up; then a last 5-minute warning, for example). This will help make transitions easier for you and your child over the holidays, and lessen the chances that Johnny’s still playing a video game in his pajamas while the car’s idling in the driveway with the rest of the family waiting.

5 ) role modeling

This is a gift to give all year long. You may not think your hyperactive little angel is paying attention; trust me, they are. They’re not only watching, they’re absorbing everything you do. My parents smoked and drank; my mom loved being outdoors and being creative; my dad never hesitated to help anyone in need. All of these things and more showed up in my adult life. I wasn’t as distracted as they thought, after all.

6 ) meditation

Meditation can be an effective non-drug treatment for kids (and adults) with ADHD. Make this a family activity, and you’ll not only be a good role model; you’ll be giving your child gift #1 – your time. And – bonus – meditation will be good for you too, especially if you’ve already given your child the gift of ADHD through your genes!

7 ) nature

Getting outdoors, getting exercise; two ADHD symptom soothers!

Getting outdoors, getting exercise; two ADHD symptom soothers!

Being out in nature is great for people with ADHD. It’s good for anyone, but a lot of us ADHDers feel so much better in the woods, walking along the shoreline, hiking in the mountains, it’s worth a shot to get out there with your kids at least once a week to see if this helps keep them on an even keel.

8 ) exercise

Exercise is one of the all-time best treatments for ADHD, and it’ll give your child better overall health and well-being, including helping them to sleep better (a problem for a lot of kids with ADHD) and the ability to focus better. As with the other gifts, this one can be shared by the whole family.

A gift for the whole family!

Finally, remember that every one of these gifts is a gift to the whole family. Helping your child with ADHD to not only manage their symptoms, but most importantly, to accept their symptoms and themselves no matter what, is the best gift you can give – and – bonus – none of these gifts have to be wrapped!

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    Last reviewed: 13 Dec 2011

APA Reference
Kessler, Z. (2011). 8 Gifts for ADHD Kids. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 3, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-zoe/2011/12/8-gifts-for-adhd-kids/

 

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