Courtesy google Maps

The city of my birth has grown at an alarming rate.

And I only know one of them. Well, okay, I know the one where I set my GPS to an address and let it tell me where to go. I’m use to being told where to go, I’ve been told plenty.

I would really like to set the GPS voice to that of a Scottish Female. I find that accent very appealing. But I’m pretty sure I’d just find that to be distracting. I’m also certain I’d be taking wrong turns just to hear her say “That’s okay, sure, we’ll just be recalculating and we’ll have you back on the rrrright rrroad in noo time.”

Back on track …

But the GPS isn’t what I want to tell you about. I want to talk about ADHD Navigation. On Tuesday of this week, I hit the road at 5AM for a run down to that city with the international reputation, that you may all hold accountable as the place of my birth. That’s right, Toronto. Toronto has grown a bit since 1959, and I have too. For one thing, I find myself calmer and cooler if I steer clear of such hectic urban sprawl.

Don’t get me wrong, I love the city … once I’m in it. I love walking down streets of culture. Past culture, current culture, future culture, I feel at home in the melee of sights and sounds and smells.

Wait, am I lost, again?

Again I digress. I was talking about navigating, ADHD style. But now, looking back on what I’ve written, I see I haven’t so much digressed as given you an example of ADHD Navigation. I’ll get there, just not on time, and not likely via the most direct route. And that was my trip to Toronto, and also my return home.

My passenger and I were on our way to her new apartment to deliver some of her belongings. She doesn’t drive and told me that she has only a vague sense of which highways go where. And we get along well enough to chatter quite a bit, so road signs are no help beyond providing options for more conversation – “I wonder what that sign said?”

So the rule of the day for navigation was just keep heading South and East, on the way down, then North and West on the way home.

All those in favor …

Turns were decided on by majority vote, which was usually a vote of one, with the other voter abstaining. One or the other of us would say “I think we should take that road coming up, and the other one would say “Whatever you think best …” thinking “I’m sure you’re so wrong.” but sub consciously hoping the other one was right.

And more often than not, we were right. On the way home, we discussed this means of navigation. She had been a bit upset by it I think, but seemed relieved when I said I didn’t care. I think she was worried that I might have expected her to navigate with detailed precision.

Zen and the art of friendship maintenance

I pointed out that we had seen some wonderful sights, and had some delightful conversation. That our friendship had not suffered and, in fact had more likely grown stronger. She laughed when I called my means of finding my way “holistic navigation.”

Sometimes when I’m bouncing from thing to thing in my scattered world, I come across stuff I might have missed had I not been … you know, looking at everything at once, the whole picture. I think that holistic navigation, while still in its infancy, is well worth looking into. Someone should focus on that, eh?

 


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    Last reviewed: 9 May 2013

APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2013). There’s A Right Way, A Wrong Way, And An ADHD Way To Navigate. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 11, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2013/05/theres-a-right-way-a-wrong-way-and-an-adhd-way-to-navigate/

 

 

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